Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European Patent Office Proves The Pioneering Character Of The Movement System Of The University Of Malaga's Medical Robot

27.02.2007
The European Patent Office has established that the method to operate the articulated arm of the University of Malaga’s medical robot is a great novelty with regard to other ones of its kind in the world because it does not require a previous gauging to position the laparoscope.

This device, specially used in operations to extract the vesicle, has been officially acknowledged, which will allow its exclusive commercialisation and production all over the world without interfering with other foreign models.

The robot, the first of its kind made in Spain, is designed to assist surgeons during laparoscope operations, a low impact surgical technique that consists of small incisions through which a video mini-camera and the instruments that are necessary for the operation are introduced into the patient.

’When you operate with this type of robots, there is the problem of knowing exactly where the incision point must be made in the patient’s abdomen so as to know how deep the optical device has been introduced’, Víctor Muñoz explained; he is leading this project and is part of the research lines of Ingeniería de Sistemas y Automática research group. Currently, robots like the American Da Vinci, with about 100 million dollars financing, solve this difficulty by using a previous complex mechanical system, whereas others use laser or fix the patient and the machine to the stretcher. In turn, the University of Malaga’s robot, financed with about 18,000 euros, avoids all those hindrances using control algorithms and putting a passive wrist in its articulated arm that allows it to move it in any direction.

More advantages and commercialisation

The system of movement of the laparoscope multiplies the advantages of the robot. According to Muñoz, you can carry out an operation which needs more than one incision as it does not require any previous gauging. ‘It is very easy to use, it immediately starts up, it does not require maintenance and it can easily be adapted to any operation theatre’, Muñoz said, who is also the director of the Oficina de Transferencia de Resultados de Investigación of the University of Malaga.

Today, the research group and the company SENER are carrying out the work prior to the commercialisation of the robot. Once the knowledge on electronics and cinematic configuration of the prototype is transferred, they will focus their attention on improving the software. ‘We intend to reach the quality levels of the U.S.’ Food and Drugs Administration’, Muñoz said. If we succeed in doing so, the robot can be easily launched into the foreign markets and would also be the first one of its kind to get a certificate’, its creator believes.

The trial stage and the beginning of making the prototypes to commercialise the robot will take place throughout 2007. Clinical trials will be carried out then and the product will be adapted to the EC Market; that is, its electromagnetic compatibility and electrical safety will be adapted, and it will be tested on humans. However, the robot has already been used in operations on over 20 people at Hospital Clínico de Málaga.

Ismael Gaona | alfa
Further information:
http://www.andaluciainvestiga.com

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptoms
18.08.2017 | Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

nachricht Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) overcomes swallowing disorders and hypersalivation – a case report
10.08.2017 | Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>