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Clinicians Worldwide Experiencing Efficiency Gains with Siemens syngo.via

29.11.2010
Since Siemens Healthcare launched syngo.via, its imaging software for multimodality reading of clinical cases, clinicians worldwide are reporting significant workflow efficiency gains.

More than 100 installations of syngo.via have been delivered worldwide, and healthcare organizations are already benefiting from the advantages of syngo.via embedded in their clinical routine with advanced visualization tools and automated processes leading to faster reading times and lowered costs.

Siemens will showcase a series of customer testimonials throughout its RSNA booth that will enable visitors to learn more about the solution first hand.

syngo.via helps increase reading efficiency across multiple specialties, including oncology, cardiology, and neurology – enabling clinicians to effortlessly access state-of-the-art advanced visualization tools across the clinical spectrum. Clinicians employing syngo.via are already attesting to enhanced workflow efficiency.

"syngo.via's speed and advanced applications are some of the things that impress me the most about this solution," explains Dr. Barton Milestone, Vice Chair, Diagnostic Imaging and Director of MRI, Fox Chase Cancer Center, PA.

“In the past, a lot of time was spent for routine cardiac imaging – anywhere from 30 to 50 minutes for a patient with benign results,” said Peter Sögner, MD, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. “Today with syngo.via, if the vessels are normal, in case of coronaries without stenoses, you can perform the same task in one minute." “We have a high workload in our institution, so time is of the essence,” states Prof. Dr. Gudrun Feuchtner, Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. “With syngo.via, I can complete readings quickly and efficiently – in just minutes. Not only does this make my work easier, it allows for faster patient results.”

Siemens Healthcare is conducting an efficiency survey about the most common advanced reading and visualization workflows with syngo.via across several clinics worldwide. This approach helps healthcare providers identify potential areas for efficiency gains and workflow optimization.

syngo.via background information

syngo.via integrates imaging devices, such as MRI, CT, and PET-CT scanners with Radiology Information Systems (RIS) and Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) of leading vendors, including Siemens’ newest PACS solution, syngo.plaza. When syngo.via and syngo.plaza are combined, users are presented with direct, no-click access between the two technologies and a unified user-interface for faster reading. One of syngo.via’s distinct advantages is its Automated Case Preparation functionality, which automatically loads images into the appropriate application and sorts them into the corresponding disease-specific layout, thereby eliminating the need to manually choose the application, load data, and select corresponding layouts. Also unique to syngo.via is the Case Navigator functionality, which supports structured workflow by categorizing various workflow steps and aligning the proper images to each corresponding step. Furthermore, during the reading process, findings and measurements can be automatically tracked and listed with the one-of-a-kind Findings Navigator, which allows users to effectively navigate between various findings with just one click.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 48,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2010 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 12.4 billion euros and profit of around 750 million euros.

syngo.via can be used as a standalone device or together with a variety of syngo.via-based software options, which are medical devices in their own rights. The product and the syngo.via based software options are pending in some countries along with the necessary releases and thus are not yet available for sales in all countries, e.g. Brazil.

The outcomes achieved by the Siemens customers described herein were achieved in the customer's unique setting. Since there is no "typical" hospital and many variables exist (e.g., hospital size, case mix, level of IT adoption) there can be no guarantee that others will achieve the same results.

Florian Gersbach | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

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