Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Clinicians Worldwide Experiencing Efficiency Gains with Siemens syngo.via

29.11.2010
Since Siemens Healthcare launched syngo.via, its imaging software for multimodality reading of clinical cases, clinicians worldwide are reporting significant workflow efficiency gains.

More than 100 installations of syngo.via have been delivered worldwide, and healthcare organizations are already benefiting from the advantages of syngo.via embedded in their clinical routine with advanced visualization tools and automated processes leading to faster reading times and lowered costs.

Siemens will showcase a series of customer testimonials throughout its RSNA booth that will enable visitors to learn more about the solution first hand.

syngo.via helps increase reading efficiency across multiple specialties, including oncology, cardiology, and neurology – enabling clinicians to effortlessly access state-of-the-art advanced visualization tools across the clinical spectrum. Clinicians employing syngo.via are already attesting to enhanced workflow efficiency.

"syngo.via's speed and advanced applications are some of the things that impress me the most about this solution," explains Dr. Barton Milestone, Vice Chair, Diagnostic Imaging and Director of MRI, Fox Chase Cancer Center, PA.

“In the past, a lot of time was spent for routine cardiac imaging – anywhere from 30 to 50 minutes for a patient with benign results,” said Peter Sögner, MD, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. “Today with syngo.via, if the vessels are normal, in case of coronaries without stenoses, you can perform the same task in one minute." “We have a high workload in our institution, so time is of the essence,” states Prof. Dr. Gudrun Feuchtner, Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. “With syngo.via, I can complete readings quickly and efficiently – in just minutes. Not only does this make my work easier, it allows for faster patient results.”

Siemens Healthcare is conducting an efficiency survey about the most common advanced reading and visualization workflows with syngo.via across several clinics worldwide. This approach helps healthcare providers identify potential areas for efficiency gains and workflow optimization.

syngo.via background information

syngo.via integrates imaging devices, such as MRI, CT, and PET-CT scanners with Radiology Information Systems (RIS) and Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) of leading vendors, including Siemens’ newest PACS solution, syngo.plaza. When syngo.via and syngo.plaza are combined, users are presented with direct, no-click access between the two technologies and a unified user-interface for faster reading. One of syngo.via’s distinct advantages is its Automated Case Preparation functionality, which automatically loads images into the appropriate application and sorts them into the corresponding disease-specific layout, thereby eliminating the need to manually choose the application, load data, and select corresponding layouts. Also unique to syngo.via is the Case Navigator functionality, which supports structured workflow by categorizing various workflow steps and aligning the proper images to each corresponding step. Furthermore, during the reading process, findings and measurements can be automatically tracked and listed with the one-of-a-kind Findings Navigator, which allows users to effectively navigate between various findings with just one click.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 48,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2010 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 12.4 billion euros and profit of around 750 million euros.

syngo.via can be used as a standalone device or together with a variety of syngo.via-based software options, which are medical devices in their own rights. The product and the syngo.via based software options are pending in some countries along with the necessary releases and thus are not yet available for sales in all countries, e.g. Brazil.

The outcomes achieved by the Siemens customers described herein were achieved in the customer's unique setting. Since there is no "typical" hospital and many variables exist (e.g., hospital size, case mix, level of IT adoption) there can be no guarantee that others will achieve the same results.

Florian Gersbach | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) overcomes swallowing disorders and hypersalivation – a case report
10.08.2017 | Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.

nachricht New microscope technique reveals internal structure of live embryos
08.08.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences

Mars 2020 mission to use smart methods to seek signs of past life

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>