Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tyre safety takes a front seat in TYRESENSE project

22.11.2006
Proper tyre maintenance is an important yet often neglected element in road safety. Studies have shown that while, in some European countries, three out of four people wash their cars every month, only one in seven checks their tyre pressure. Properly maintained tyres improve the steering, stopping, traction, and load-carrying capability of your vehicle.

The EUREKA E! 2375 TYRESENSE project is developing sensors that can be embedded in tyres to detect critical driving conditions, helping to reduce maintenance costs and environmental impact, and preventing potentially life-threatening accidents.

“The importance of checking your tyres cannot be overstated, says Eckhard Quandt of the Center of Advanced European Studies and Research, in Germany. “Remember, tyres are the only contact between your vehicle and the road. Not only are under-inflated tyres more prone to damage and failure, having potentially serious consequences in terms of safety, but they can also lead to higher fuel costs.”

Monitoring the tyre

The deformation of tyre material under static and driving conditions can provide a great deal of important information. The aim of the EUREKA TYRESENSE project, carried out by partners in Germany and Luxembourg, was to develop a sensor system for monitoring critical tyre conditions such as pressure and temperature, as well as conditions between the tyre and roadway.

It had to comply with a number of requirements. “The proposed system will reduce maintenance costs, prevent catastrophic failures, such as blowouts, and, ultimately, reduce environmental impact by increasing tyre lifetime,” says Quandt. “It will also be capable of recognising the so-called 'slip position', which indicates loss of grip before a tyre begins to slide on the road surface. This means we can warn drivers to slow down under dangerous conditions. In other words, we are introducing a powerful new tool for enhancing active vehicle safety.”

The new sensor could also be linked to the development of new tyres with improved force transmission under different driving conditions and an improved anti-blocking system.

The future looks bright

Project participants believe that TYRESENSE will hit the ground running, with partners looking to exploit an initial market of 186 million tyres in Europe, working with major tyre manufacturer Goodyear. There is also the potential for widened industrial research partnerships in the area of remote magneto-elastic sensors, and a variety of new applications for this exciting technology, including torque and stress measurements on rotating shafts and in engines or turbines, or pressure measurements in chemical plants.

All TYRESENSE partners, in Germany and Luxembourg, have acknowledged the invaluable support of the EUREKA programme in getting the project off and running and seeing it to a successful conclusion.

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/tyresense

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

nachricht From parking garage to smart multi-purpose garage
19.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>