Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dynamic Toll for Smooth-Flowing Traffic

15.08.2011
Highway traffic can flow more freely thanks to a dynamic toll. Siemens has developed a special algorithm for traffic control systems that adjusts the toll charge to the current traffic situation.

In return, the system lets motorists enjoy the benefits of getting to their destinations more quickly, while also helping to prevent traffic jams and reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The first special highway lane with the innovative control system, known as the “fast lane”, is on the highway connecting Jerusalem and Tel Aviv in Israel.


Many densely populated areas have problems with traffic during peak periods. Special lanes whose use is subject to a fee are often provided to improve the flow of traffic and encourage people to form car pools or use public transportation. The greatest challenge here is the need to set the fees at a level that will ensure the lane’s capacity is sufficiently utilized and that traffic jams will be prevented. Siemens Mobility has responded to this challenge by developing a traffic control system that enables a steady driving speed while ensuring optimal use of capacity.

The system uses induction loops in the road surface to register the speed and numbers of vehicles on the free driving lanes and the fast lane. The heart of the system is a complex algorithm that uses the measured data to calculate the toll fees down to the minute. Ultimately this leads to evenly distributed traffic density on the special lane: When traffic is light, the toll fee drops, giving drivers an incentive to use the lane. When traffic gets heavier, the fee increases, which deters some drivers and thus prevents congestion. The updated toll fee is displayed on electronic traffic signs at entrances to the fast lane. For calculating the toll fee, a video system films the vehicle’s license plate number when it enters the lane. The fee can be debited from the bank accounts of drivers who have registered for this option in advance; otherwise they receive a bill. Buses and fully occupied vehicles are exempt from the toll. The fast lane is 12 kilometers long and makes it possible to cover the distance in about 12 minutes — compared to the 30 to 60 minutes the trip can take during peak hours.

The fast lane was built by Shapir Civil & Marine Engineering Ltd., an Israeli company. And another Israeli company, R.S. Industries / Orad Group, is responsible for toll billing. From Siemens’ point of view, a very promising market for the new traffic control system is the U.S., where there are already many fast lanes in use, but so far with little flexibility of toll calculation.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>