Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

USM Unveils Plant Genome of Billion-dollar Global Industry

29.10.2009
The Centre for Chemical Biology, Universiti Sains Malaysia had successfully decoded the rubber tree genome. This accomplishment could potentially place Malaysia as the biggest producer of rubber.

The Minister of Higher Education Dato’ Seri Mohamed Khaled Nordin announced at CCB@USM yesterday that this major achievement could lead to many end products and contribute to the billion dollar rubber industry.

Khaled stated that CCB@USM had successfully decoded the draft of the 2 billion base genome of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis through its chemical biology discovery platform.

“This project is a result of an international collaboration led by CCB@USM that forms an excellent foundation for major contributions to society at the bottom billion,” he said during the press conference.

Also present were the Vice Chancellor of Universiti Sains Malaysia Prof. Tan Sri Dato’ Dzulkifli Abdul Razak, the Chief Executive Officer of CCB@USM, Prof Maqsudul Alam, and the Chief Operating Officer of Malaysian Biotechnology Corporation, Dr. Wan Abdul Rahman Wan Yaacob.

Khaled added that the most significant benefit of this finding was that it will help the nation in developing a high quality breed of rubber tree with resistance to diseases such as South American Leaf Blight and white root.

He also explained that Malaysia could potentially be the hub for rubber tree biotechnological research in Asia and at the same time train competent younger generation of scientists skilled in various disciplines such as genomics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics.

The Deputy Director (Research) of CCB@USM, Prof Nazalan Najimudin, expressed that this effort will empower the nation (Malaysia) to remain as the leader in rubber research and be at the forefront in the global rubber industry. This will enhance Malaysia’s competitiveness in rubber production. Malaysia is currently the world's fourth biggest producer, after Indonesia, Thailand, and India.

“The genome information will enable researchers to understand genetic characteristics of different breeds of rubber trees well in advance compared to conventional breeding techniques that are currently being used. As an example, for the development of the rubber tree for the timber or wood industry, determination of the girth of a rubber tree may take 10 to 12 years. With this genome information, we may be able to detect varieties that are able to produce large girths as early as a year or less.”

“This is one obvious benefit that we could obtain from this rubber tree genome. There are many other biotechnological studies which deal with pharmaceuticals, health, and others that can be performed.”

Nazalan also explained that institutions of higher learning contribute to innovations that could give high benefits to the national economy.

“This study relies upon the belief that for us to advance and obtain good returns involving the rubber tree, we must have the fundamental knowledge and the basic information on the rubber tree itself.”

“Filing of intellectual property claims requires one to possess information or knowledge which is not yet released to the public domain. Therefore, this genome sequencing project allows us to discover key information and protect them before others can exploit and make claims. “

He reiterated that furniture from rubberwood has proven popular and is an important export for Malaysia. The trait that can be developed and improved is in the properties of rubberwood and the genome information will move this area of plant breeding very fast.

For further enquiry, please contact:

PROFESSOR NAZALAN NAJIMUDIN
DEPUTY DIRECTOR (RESEARCH)
CENTRE FOR CHEMICAL BIOLOGY (CCB@USM)
UNIVERSITI SAINS MALAYSIA
11800 PENANG
MALAYSIA
Email: nazalan@usm.my
Phone: +60 12 598 5600

Prof Nazalan Najimudin | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.usm.my
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>