Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

TGen finds protein inhibitor revives chemotherapy for ovarian patients

06.07.2010
Discovery provides new hope to cancer patients with few treatment options

Investigators at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) have discovered a way that may help ovarian cancer patients who no longer respond to conventional chemotherapy.

A scientific paper that will be published in the September issue of the journal Gynecologic Oncology describes how the inhibition of a protein, CHEK1, may be an effective element to incorporate into therapies for women with ovarian cancer.

The research led by TGen's Dr. David Azorsa, a Senior Investigator, and Dr. Shilpi Arora, a Staff Scientist, found that inhibiting CHEK1 by a small molecule known as PD 407824, enabled ovarian cancer cells to be attacked again by cisplatin, a widely used platinum-based chemotherapy drug for women with ovarian cancer.

"PD 407824 is only available for laboratory research, but other drugs inhibiting CHEK1 are already used to treat patients in the clinic," said Dr. Raoul Tibes, one of the paper's senior a co-authors and an Associate Investigator in TGen's Clinical Translational Research Division.

The prognosis remains poor for patients with ovarian cancer, which kills nearly 14,600 women in the U.S. annually. The standard treatment for cancer of the ovaries, which produce human egg cells, is surgical removal of the cancer, followed by chemotherapy.

The TGen team proved their method in the research laboratory, which is very encouraging, considering that the use of protein inhibitors in combination with cisplatin, is also proving to be effective in clinical trials with cancer patients.

"The clinical relevance is high, as such novel molecular concepts — inhibiting the repair of cancer cells after treatment with chemotherapies — are in development for many different cancers," said Dr. Tibes, a medical oncologist who treats patients with advanced cancers at TGen Clinical Research Services (TCRS) at Scottsdale Healthcare.

"We actually have similar drug combinations that go after preventing cancer cells to repair themselves, in the clinic already, and we have seen early exciting results. Patients whose tumors had stopped responding to conventional chemotherapy have been made sensitive again, meaning some of these patients responded again to the chemotherapy. The importance of the paper is that it provides evidence that combinations of cisplatin and CHEK1 inhibitors may be worthwhile pursuing in patients with ovarian cancer," said Dr. Tibes.

TCRS is a partnership between TGen and Scottsdale Healthcare that enables laboratory discoveries to be quickly translated into effective therapies for patients at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare.

For this research, TGen investigators used cutting-edge technology to screen 572 kinases, the body's protein enzymes that affect how cells function. They discovered 55 siRNAs — strands of RNA molecules that affect the expression of genes — that to some degree enabled cisplatin to slow the growth of cancer cells.

According to the paper, one of those small molecule inhibitors, PD 407824, was especially effective in sensitizing ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and OVCAR3, to the growth inhibiting effects of cisplatin. PD 407824 and SB 218078 were the two small molecule inhibitors to CHEK1, that were found to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine, according to a paper published by the same group last year in the Journal of Translational Medicine.

"Our new data provide kinase targets that could be exploited to design better therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients," said Dr. David Azorsa, Head of TGen's Biological Therapeutics Lab and the senior author of the paper published in Gynecologic Oncology.

In addition, Shilpi Arora, a TGen Staff Scientist and the paper's lead author, said this data, "also demonstrate the effectiveness of high-throughput RNAi screening as a tool for identifying sensitizing targets to known and established chemotherapeutic agents."

About TGen

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. Research at TGen is focused on helping patients with diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes. TGen is on the cutting edge of translational research where investigators are able to unravel the genetic components of common and complex diseases. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities, TGen believes it can make a substantial contribution to the efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is affiliated with the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

Press Contact:
Steve Yozwiak
TGen Senior Science Writer
602-343-8704
syozwiak@tgen.org

Steve Yozwiak | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.tgen.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>