Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Students’ Device Could Improve Collection of Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood

21.06.2011
Johns Hopkins graduate students have invented a system to significantly boost the number of stem cells collected from a newborn’s umbilical cord and placenta, so that many more patients with leukemia, lymphoma and other blood disorders can be treated with these valuable cells.

The prototype is still in the testing stage, but initial results are promising. The student inventors have obtained a provisional patent covering the technology and have formed a company, TheraCord, to further develop the technology, which may someday be used widely in hospital maternity units. The students say the need for this system is obvious.

“Cord blood, collected from the umbilical cord and placenta after live birth, is the most viable source of stem cells, yet over 90 percent is uncollected and discarded,” the team members wrote in a presentation of their project at the university’s recent Biomedical Engineering Design Day. “One of the main reasons valuable cord blood is so frequently discarded is because no adequate collection method exists.”

The students say their easy-to-use invention, called the CBx System, could remedy these shortcomings.

When a baby is born, a few families pay for private collection and storage of the child’s cord blood, in case its stem cells are needed to treat a future illness. When families do not choose this option, the materials containing cord blood are generally thrown away as medical waste. But at the 180 hospitals affiliated with public cord blood banks, new mothers can donate cord blood so that its stem cells can be extracted and used to rebuild the immune systems of seriously ill patients, particularly those with blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma.

According to the Johns Hopkins students, the current method of collecting these cells from cord blood doesn’t work well because it relies strictly on gravity. The National Marrow Donor Program says about 50 percent of the units collected in this way contain enough stem cells to be stored for transplant use. Another organization, the National Cord Blood Program, says only 40 percent of collected units meet transplantation standards. Even when the procedure is successful, the Johns Hopkins students said, the average collection yields only enough stem cells to treat a child but not enough to treat an adult patient, based on the recommended cell dosage.

To solve these problems, the students, who were enrolled in a master’s degree program in the university’s Center for Bioengineering Innovation & Design, spent the past year developing a new collection method that uses both mechanical forces and a chemical solution to help detach and flush more stem cells from the cord and placenta blood vessels.

“This is important for two reasons,” said James Waring, a member of the student team. “First, we believe it collects enough cells from each birth so that stem-cell therapy can be used on adult patients, who need more cells.”

In addition, in early testing on discarded cords and placentas at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the team’s device collected up to 50 percent more stem cells than the traditional gravity system, the students said. “We think our system will increase the number of successful cord blood collections, meaning more patients overall will benefit,” Waring said.

Along with Waring, the student inventors were Elias Bitar, Christopher Chiang, Matthew Means and Sean Monagle. While developing the system, the team entered its project in college business plan competitions, gathering recognition from judges and about $14,000 in prize money. After completing their academic program, the students recently received their master’s degrees. Team members Chiang and Means have chosen to remain in Baltimore to manage and advance TheraCord over the coming year.

“Our next step,” said Chiang, “is to optimize the system so that it collects even more stem cells. Based on previous experiments using similar techniques, we believe it’s possible to get two to five times the amount produced by the existing gravity technique. The other important goal is to make the system as easy as possible for hospital employees to use.”

The students learned about the need for a better way to collect stem cells early in their master’s program, when they accompanied physicians on hospital rounds to learn what new medical tools and devices were needed most urgently.

Edith Gurewitsch, a Johns Hopkins School of Medicine associate professor of gynecology/obstetrics and biomedical engineering, first identified the clinical need for a better method to collect cord blood. Agreeing to be the student team’s clinical advisor, she provided guidance on both the clinical and workflow aspects of the device’s design. In the patent documents, Gurewitsch is listed as a co-inventor of the CBx System technology.

Related links:

Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design: http://cbid.bme.jhu.edu/

Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering: http://www.bme.jhu.edu/

Johns Hopkins University news releases can be found online at http://www.jhu.edu/news_info/news. Information on automatic e-mail delivery of science and medical news releases is available at the same address.

June 20, 2011 Tags: biomedical engineering, blood bank, cord blood, Johns Hopkins Engineering, leukemia, lymphona, myeoloma, stem cells

Posted in Engineering, Medicine and Nursing, Student-Related News, Technology

Office of News and Information
Johns Hopkins University
901 South Bond Street, Suite 540
Baltimore, Maryland 21231
Phone: 443-287-9960 | Fax: 443-287-9920

Phil Sneiderman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Tag it EASI – a new method for accurate protein analysis
20.06.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

nachricht How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries
19.06.2018 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Creating a new composite fuel for new-generation fast reactors

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>