Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Soap Bubbles for Treating Stenosed Blood Vessels

11.03.2016

Liposomes are currently used as drug delivery vehicles but recognized by the immune system. Scientists from the universities of Basel and Fribourg have shown that special artificial liposomes do not elicit any reaction in human and porcine sera as well as pigs. The study was published in the Journal Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine.

Liposomes are soap-bubble-like nanocontainers made of a double phospholipid membrane that shields off an inner aqueous compartment. In a lenticular form, as developed by Professor Andreas Zumbühl’s team at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Fribourg, they are promising candidates for drug delivery to constricted coronary arteries. Here, the blood flows through the stenosed artery segments with high velocity and is subjected to enhanced shear forces. Under these conditions, the liposomes open and release their content.


The drug molecules (red) are embedded in a water-filled cavity inside of the phopholipid vesicle.

University of Basel/University of Fribourg

Unfortunately, the immune system does recognize these liposomes as foreign bodies. The activation of the immune system may lead to a pseudo-allergy. Earlier studies have shown that negative effects are found in up to 30 percent of the cases. Even using clinically approved liposomal dugs it is possible to find anaphylactic shocks, which can be highly toxic for the treated patient.

No Reaction in Pig Studies

A team of researchers led by Prof. Bert Müller from the Biomaterials Science Center of the University of Basel and Prof. Andreas Zumbühl from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Fribourg has tested artificial phospholipid vesicles (Pad-PC-Pad vesicles) for their potential as drug delivery nanocontainers. Surprisingly, these liposomes did not spur any reaction neither in blood serum of pigs nor humans.

In a next step, the vesicles were tested in living organisms. The researchers injected three Yorkshire pigs with Pad-PC-Pad suspensions and monitored the heart rate, the electrocardiogram and the blood pressures. Even at high doses the pigs showed no or negligible reactions. The biopsies of pig tissues showed no toxic changes in kidneys, lungs, heart, and liver. “The study shows that Pad-PC-Pad liposomes are not inducing direct or indirect anaphylactic reactions, even at high dosages”, says Professor Bert Müller of the University of Basel. “These are highly unexpected results could have a high impact of future treatments of atherosclerosis.”

According to the World Health Organization WHO coronary artery diseases are responsible for 30 % of deaths worldwide. In the case of constricted coronary arteries the conditions often gets worse during the transport of the patient to the hospital, showing the need for medication that efficiently covers the pre-hospital segment. Pad-PC-Pad vesicles therefore show high potential because, in contrast to existing liposomes, they do not elicit a significant immune response.

Original source
Simon Bugna, Marzia Buscema, Sofiya Matviykiv, Rudolf Urbanics, Andreas Weinberger, Tamas Meszaros, Janos Szebeni, Andreas Zumbuehl, Till Saxer, and Bert Müller
Surprising lack of liposome-induced complement activation by artificial 1,3-diamidophospholipids in vitro
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine 12 (2016) | doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2015.12.364

Further information
Prof. Bert Müller, University of Basel, Biomaterials Science Center, phone +41 61 265 9660, email: bert.mueller@unibas.ch
Prof. Andreas Zumbühl, University of Fribourg, Department of Chemistry, phone +41 26 300 8794, email: andreas.zumbuehl@unifr.ch

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.unibas.ch/en/News-Events/News/Uni-Research/Soap-Bubbles-for-Treating...

Reto Caluori | Universität Basel

Further reports about: coronary arteries immune system liposomes vesicles

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>