Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The silence of the genes

23.04.2010
How viruses manipulate host cells by means of molecular mimics

Viruses have evolved a broad range of strategies that enable them to evade the immune systems of their hosts. A team of researchers led by LMU virologist Professor Jürgen Haas has been studying a novel, recently discovered mechanism that pathogenic viruses exploit for this purpose, and their latest results could point the way to new antiviral therapies.

The mechanism is based on the production of short RNA molecules, called microRNAs, by the virus. RNA is chemically related to the genetic material DNA, and full-length RNA copies of gene sequences specify the structures of all cell proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), on the other hand, play a crucial role in regulating gene expression. "Viruses use them to regulate the expression not only of their own genes, but also of host genes", says Haas. "Because human cells also produce regulatory miRNAs, the viral molecules do not provoke an immune response". Haas and his team, in cooperation with several other groups in Germany and abroad, have now identified 158 human genes that are targeted by miRNAs synthesized by two types of herpesvirus that can cause cancer in humans. "Our findings provide fundamental insights into the functions of viral miRNAs", according to Haas. "The viral genes that encode miRNAs could offer points of attack for targeted, and urgently needed, antiviral agents." (Cell Host and Microbe online, 22 April 2010)

Gene regulation, the biological process by which genes are turned on and off, is a fundamental element of cell function. A gene is a defined segment of the double-stranded genomic DNA. When a gene is active, the sequence of such a segment is transcribed from one DNA strand into RNA copies. The RNAs known as messenger RNAs (mRNAs) specify the sequences of all the proteins required by a given cell type by a second process known as translation. The proteins made by a cell determine its structure and function, so the appropriate proteins must be produced in the correct amounts and at the right time. Gene expression is therefore strictly controlled. In recent years it has become clear that short RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in this process in most organisms. The sequences of miRNAs are "complementary" to parts of mRNAs, and bind to them to form partially double-stranded structures. This prevents synthesis of the corresponding proteins and may lead to the degradation of the mRNAs. It is estimated that the expression of 20-30% of all human genes is regulated in this way. "The system acts as a sensitive regulator for fine tuning of many cell functions", says Professor Jürgen Haas of the Max von Pettenkofer Institute at LMU Munich. "It is also essential for proper tissue development."

Viruses too use miRNAs to regulate expression of their genes. But some viral miRNAs do double duty by intervening in the regulation of the host's genes. Viruses consist only of a DNA or RNA genome wrapped in a protein coat, and they must infiltrate into cells in order to reproduce. Having invaded a suitable cell, a virus essentially reprograms it to produce new viral particles. "The battle between virus and host begins as soon as the first cell has been infected", reports Haas. "In principle, the immune system is capable of recognizing infected cells and inducing them to undergo programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptosis involves the orderly destruction of cells -- and any viruses they may contain -- but viruses have developed multiple ways of preventing it. Indeed, to enhance their own replication, some viruses even cause their host cells to enter a state of uncontrolled proliferation, and this can ultimately lead to cancers, as is the case with certain herpesviruses that infect humans."

Two of these, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus (KSHV), cause chronic infections of B cells (the antibody-producing cells of the immune system) and both can provoke the development of malignancies. It was already known that herpesviruses carry genetic information for the synthesis of miRNAs. Haas and his collaborators set out to identify the host mRNAs on which these inhibitory molecules might act. They first isolated the molecular complex that brings the snippets of viral RNA and their targets together. Microarray analysis of the associated host mRNAs then allowed the investigators to identify the corresponding cellular genes affected. "We were able to identify 158 genes in this way", says Haas. "Many of them code for proteins involved in antiviral defence, so it makes sense that the virus should try to turn such genes off. Our work not only shows how viruses control host gene expression, it identifies viral miRNA genes as possible targets for innovative antiviral agents. If we could design and deliver therapeutic miRNAs tailored to bind to viral miRNAs, we might be able to defeat the virus by turning its own weapons against it."

Publication:
"Systematic Analysis of Viral and Cellular MicroRNA Targets in Cells Latently Infected with Human γ-Herpesviruses by RISC Immunoprecipitation Assay";
Lars Dölken et.al.,
Cell Host and Microbe online, 22. April 2010
Doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2010.03.008
Contact:
Professor Jürgen Haas
Max-von-Pettenkofer Institut der LMU München
Phone: +44 (0) 131 242 6859 (22./23.4.10), +49 (0) 89 / 5160 – 5290 (ab 26.4.10)
E-mail: haas@lmb.uni-muenchen.de
Web: www.bio.ifi.lmu.de/drittmittelprojekte/ngfn-plus
www.baygene.de/pro-dt-3_1a.htm

Professor Juergen Haas | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.lmb.uni-muenchen.de
http://www.bio.ifi.lmu.de/drittmittelprojekte/ngfn-plus
http://www.baygene.de/pro-dt-3_1a.htm

Further reports about: DNA LMU MicroRNA RNA RNA molecule Virus cell death cell function chronic infection immune system microbe

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease
22.06.2018 | Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

nachricht Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development
22.06.2018 | Duke University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences

When fluid flows almost as fast as light -- with quantum rotation

22.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>