Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

On the road to Sustainable Uses of Baltic Marine Resources

10.09.2010
The project “Submariner - Sustainable Uses of Baltic Marine Resources” will turn the Baltic Sea into a model region by fostering both sustainable economic development and improved environmental conditions through new maritime products and technologies.

19 partners from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Sweden will build up a regional network for cross border cooperation and develop environmentally friendly as well as economically appealing innovative uses of marine resources in the Baltic Sea. The project begins on September 9th, 2010, and is lead by the Maritime Institute in Gdansk, Poland. It runs for three years and has a budget of 3,6 Mio EUR.

The Baltic Sea Region (BSR) faces enormous challenges including growing transport, new installations, fishery declines, severe marine pollution with excessive nutrient input and the effects of climate change. But the future is not all bleak: novel technologies and growing knowledge provide opportunities for new uses of marine ecosystems, which may in the future not only have commercial appeal but also contribute to solve environmental problems. Algae and mussel cultivation reduce nutrient inflow while providing a source for bioenergy; offshore wind farms can smartly be combined with mariculture or wave energy installations; blue biotechnology utilises substances from marine organisms for development of new products that can improve overall BSR health. All these uses and technologies have, however, not been tested sufficiently within the fragile conditions of the Baltic Sea and their cumulative impacts on the environment, economic feasibility and regional applicability are not yet fully understood.

It is thus currently difficult for decision-makers to judge which uses are most desirable and what actions are necessary to create a framework beneficial to their development while discouraging potentially damaging uses. Submariner builds the road for furthering those environmentally friendly as well as economically appealing innovative uses within the BSR, thus contributing toward its aim to become a model region for sustainable sea management. It does so by:
• Selecting “best possible” future uses: conducting a comprehensive inventory of new uses, estimating their chances and resources needed across the BSR, conducting economic and environmental impact assessments, assessing the gaps and obstacles in the legal framework, investigating market and technology aspects, and conducting an overall multi-perspective evaluation
• Encouraging "best possible" future uses on a regional scale: developing plans and roadmaps for implementation of one or more uses in several BSR regions
• Stimulating cooperation among best possible users: connecting currently disjointed constituencies through virtual and real networking, information exchange and cooperations events
• Promoting "best possible" uses: developing economic and legal instruments, joint standards and criteria, developing incentives for wanted uses, discouraging environmentally damaging uses, developing recommendations for regional, national and transnational support programmes and structures

Submariner will fulfil these goals through the work of a consortium of strong partners from all BSR countries which offer all expertise necessary for the project from their own sources. It combines centres of excellence for all new uses under discussion, regional development agencies and innovation centres as well as national environmental decision-makers. Submariner is already well known to many of its target groups, including the transnational BSR networks involved in creating the path for a sustainable BSR, who have recognised Submariner as a potentially important reference for their future decision-making.

Contact:
Joanna Przedrzymirska
Maritime Institute
Dlugi Targ 41/42
80-830 Gdansk, Poland.
Tel: +48 58 301 87 24
Email: joaprz@im.gda.pl.
BioCon Valley GmbH
Dr. Gudrun Mernitz
Walther-Rathenau-Straße 49 a
17489 Greifswald
Germany
T +49 3834-515 304
F +49 3834-515 102
E info@bcv.org

Dr. Heinrich Cuypers | idw
Further information:
http://www.en.im.gda.pl/
http://www.sustainable-projects.eu
http://www.scanbalt.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht One step closer to reality
20.04.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Entwicklungsbiologie

nachricht The dark side of cichlid fish: from cannibal to caregiver
20.04.2018 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>