Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers identify genes associated with onset age of Parkinson's disease

09.10.2009
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified genes which may influence the onset age of Parkinson's Disease (PD). The findings, which currently appear on-line in BMC Medical Genetics, are the first to identify genes contributing to the variation in onset age and may help identify mechanisms and therapeutic targets capable of delaying symptoms.

PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder usually occurring late in life. It is characterized by debilitating symptoms of tremor, rigidity, and slowed ability to start and continue movements.

PD incidence increases with age from 1.7 /10,000 person-years between ages 50 to 59 to 9.3/10,000 person-years between ages 70 to 79 and has a prevalence of approximately 1.8 percent among people over the age of 65. While the average age of onset of PD is approximately 60 years, there is wide variation, with some individuals experiencing onset before age 20 and others not until after age 90.

The BUSM researchers performed analyses using genotypes generated with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in a sample of 857 unrelated, familial PD cases. Subsequently, a meta-analysis of imputed Single Nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed combining the familial PD data with that from a previous genome-wide associated study (GWAS) of 440 idiopathic PD cases. The researchers identified the 15q26.2 region as well as the gene AAK1 related to the previously observed PD susceptibility gene, GAK as areas that would benefit from further examination.

"Important distinctions can be made between those genes that influence susceptibility for developing disease, and the genetic modifiers that influence onset age," said joint lead author Jeanne C. Latourelle, DSc, from the department of neurology at BUSM

According to Latourelle, identifying these areas as associated with both PD onset age and susceptibility highlights the importance of continuing the study of onset age of PD may provide insight into the disease mechanisms and processes for delaying onset with implications for novel treatments.

Funding for this study was provided by R01 NS37167, R01 NS036711; the Robert P. & Judith N. Goldberg Foundation; the Bumpus Foundation; the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center; Italian Telethon grant n. GTB07001 and by the "Fondazione Grigioni per il Morbo di Parkinson".

Gina M. DiGravio | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bmc.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>