Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researcher Seeks to Turn Stem Cells Into Blood Vessels

20.02.2009
A Johns Hopkins engineer is trying to coax human stem cells to turn into networks of new blood vessels that could someday be used to replace damaged tissue in people with heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses.

Sharon Gerecht, an assistant professor of chemical and molecular engineering in the university’s Whiting School of Engineering, recently received a $150,000 two-year grant from the March of Dimes Foundation to support her research; earlier, she received a $310,000 four-year award from the American Heart Association to advance this promising line of study.

Gerecht is using the funds to answer important questions about what happens at the molecular level when stem cells differentiate: Which environmental cues cause them to form blood vessels instead of other types of body tissue? Is it a lack of oxygen? Is it the nutrients on which the cells feed? Is it the texture and composition of the material on which the cells are situated? And which type of stem cells is best-suited to the assembly of replacement blood vessels?

Solving these puzzles, Gerecht said, should help her and other researchers to more effectively harness the power of stem cells for human health remedies.

“Stem cell research has generated lots of excitement because it has so much potential to help so many people who are ill or injured,” she said. “But we don’t have a very good understanding of what’s going on when stem cells change into a certain type of tissue, and we can’t control the transformation with much precision. We’re trying to learn more about what causes these cells to develop and differentiate. With this knowledge in hand, we can make medical applications involving stem cells more successful and more reliable.”

To look for these answers, Gerecht, recipient of the 2008 Maryland Outstanding Young Engineer Award, is using engineering techniques to manipulate the environment in which stem cells are placed. These lab experiments are aimed at finding just the right molecular signals that will cause stem cells to form blood vessel networks.

One of these environmental factors is the amount of oxygen to which the stem cells are exposed. Reducing the oxygen these cells require creates a condition called hypoxia. “We are trying to mimic this condition in the lab,” Gerecht said, “because some research indicates that a lack of oxygen causes stem cells to form blood vessels in order to deliver more oxygenated blood to affected areas of the body. We are using our engineering approach to find out if this is actually what happens.”

The research is important because the cardiovascular network is one of the earliest differentiating and functioning systems in human embryos. The March of Dimes Foundation, which focuses on preventing birth defects, premature births and infant mortality, awarded its grant to Gerecht to study the role of hypoxia during vascular development of human embryonic stem cells. The experiments will be conducted with National Institutes of Health-approved embryonic stem cell lines. Embryonic stem cells can be made to reproduce in the lab with relative ease, Gerecht said, but it is difficult to control the differentiation of these blank-slate cells toward a specific function, such as forming blood vessels.

With support from her American Heart Association grant, the Johns Hopkins researcher is trying to determine if adult stem cells are better candidates. It is easier, Gerecht said, to direct certain adult stem cells to become the building blocks of new blood vessels. They possess another advantage: If the adult cells are taken from the patient who will ultimately receive the treatment, tissue rejection is unlikely. But adult stem cells have drawbacks as well: They are more difficult to isolate and cannot easily be made to multiply in the lab.

Gerecht also hopes to experiment with a third type that has recently attracted attention: induced pluripotent stem cells. These are adult cells that have been reprogrammed through gene manipulation to behave more like embryonic stem cells.

Major hurdles and years of additional research remain before the replacement tissue Gerecht is trying to develop may be used to restore healthy blood flow in humans. In addition to selecting the right type of stem cells and the proper growth environment, she must find the best way to persuade the cells to form the proper three-dimensional shape of living blood vessel networks. “To be able to do that,” she said, “we need to understand much more about the underlying molecular events. Then, we can manipulate these events to get the new blood vessels that we want.”

To advance her research, Gerecht has been collaborating with experts from elsewhere in the university, including Gregg Semenza and Linzhao Cheng from the School of Medicine’s Institute for Cell Engineering. She has also worked with Whiting School of Engineering colleagues Denis Wirtz, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, and Hai-Quan Mao, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering. Gerecht, Semenza, Wirtz and Mao also are affiliated with the Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins.

Gerecht earned her doctorate in biotechnology at the Technion in Israel. She then continued her research in the United States, spending three years as a postdoctoral fellow at MIT. She joined the Johns Hopkins engineering faculty in 2007.

Color images of Sharon Gerecht and her lab team available; Contact Phil Sneiderman.

Related Links:
Sharon Gerecht’s Lab Page: http://www.jhu.edu/chembe/gerecht/
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering: http://www.jhu.edu/chembe/

Phil Sneiderman | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.jhu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed
18.01.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht 127 at one blow...
18.01.2017 | Stiftung Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Leibniz-Institut für Biodiversität der Tiere

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A big nano boost for solar cells

18.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Glass's off-kilter harmonies

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

18.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>