Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research milestone in CCHF virus could help identify new treatments

19.09.2014

New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus which causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused by Ebolavirus, has identified new cellular factors essential for CCHFV infection. This discovery has the potential to lead to novel targets for therapeutic interventions against the pathogen.

The research, reported in a paper published today in the journal PLoS Pathogens and conducted by scientists at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute and their colleagues, represents a milestone in efforts to develop a treatment for CCHFV, which has a fatality rate approaching 30%.

"This new research is the first to indicate where the virus penetrates into the cell to infect it, revealing the site at which a drug therapy would need to act," said Robert Davey, Ph.D., of the Texas Biomed Department of Virology and Immunology, who led the research.

The virus is endemic to much of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and recent studies have detected CCHFV in ticks collected in Spain, indicating that the virus continues to spread. CCHFV killed a US Army serviceman stationed in Afghanistan in 2009, and was initially mistaken for Ebolavirus.

CCHFV is primarily transmitted to people from ticks and from infected livestock during the slaughtering process, although human-to-human transmission can occur from close contact with blood or other fluids from infected persons. There are no widely accepted therapies available to prevent or treat the disease.

Virus entry into the cell is the first and critical step in the virus replication cycle. To better understand the pathway for infection, researchers sought to identify cell proteins controlling CCHFV transport through the cell.

Dr. Olena Shtanko, a postdoctoral scientist in the lab, demonstrated that after passing through early endosomes, membrane-bound vesicles within cells, the virus is delivered to multivesicular bodies which are made from large collections of these vesicles. Findings suggested that these multivesicular bodies are critical for infection by CCHFV, being the sites where the virus first penetrates into the cytoplasm to start replicating and taking over the cell.

"The next step in the process is to now identify drugs that can prevent interaction of the virus with the multivesicular bodies" Davey said.

Several new drug candidates are presently being tested by Shtanko with promising results.

Several other important viruses, like influenza virus (cause of the flu) and Lassa fever virus also use multivesicular bodies to infect cells. The identified drugs have the potential to be developed into broad spectrum antiviral treatments.

###

The research was funded by the Ewing Halsell Foundation, Douglass Foundation and the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). In addition to Davey and Shtanko, co-authors of the PLoS Pathogens article included Raisa Nikitina and Alexander Chepurnov of the Institute for Clinical Immunology in Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, and Cengiz Altuntas of the Texas Institute of Biotechnology Education and Research at the North American University in Houston.

Texas Biomed, formerly the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, is one of the world's leading independent biomedical research institutions dedicated to advancing health worldwide through innovative biomedical research. Located on a 200-acre campus on the northwest side of San Antonio, Texas, the Institute partners with hundreds of researchers and institutions around the world to study the genetics of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, psychiatric disorders and other diseases, and to develop vaccines and therapeutics against viral pathogens causing AIDS, hepatitis, herpes, Ebola virus and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, and parasitic diseases responsible for malaria, schistosomiasis and Chagas disease. For more information on Texas Biomed, go to http://www.TxBiomed.org.

Lisa Cruz | Eurek Alert!

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht At last, butterflies get a bigger, better evolutionary tree
16.02.2018 | Florida Museum of Natural History

nachricht New treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease from the animal kingdom
16.02.2018 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

Im Focus: Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning system will be on display at the Hannover Messe Preview on February 6 and at the Hannover Messe proper from April 23 to 27, 2018 (Hall 6, Booth A30).

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fingerprints of quantum entanglement

16.02.2018 | Information Technology

'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

16.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Hubble sees Neptune's mysterious shrinking storm

16.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>