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DASGIP Launches Micro-bioreactor for High Throughput Screening

25.10.2007
DASGIP AG, a leading manufacturer of parallel bioreactor systems, announced the launch of a miniature bioreactor system for high throughput screening at Biotechnica, 9 – 11 October 2007, in Hanover, Germany.

The “DASGIP BioLector” has been developed by m2p-labs, Aachen, Germany, who entered into a partnership with DASGIP to bring the new product to market. Under the agreement, DASGIP has marketing rights in North-America and in Europe.


The DASGIP BioLector monitors cell growth and protein production in up to 96 wells online and in parallel. Additionally, pH or dissolved oxygen can be monitored in each well. Continuous shaking allows uninterrupted aeration by gas exchange between the cells and their environment. The BioLector provides an ideal gas atmosphere for different cell types.

With DASGIP BioLector, operators are able to screen multiple cell lines or strains for growth and expression levels in parallel. Working volumes of the 48- and 96-well plates range from 100µL to 1000 µL per well. Once the candidates of interest are selected, a tailored process can be developed and optimized in DASGIP Parallel Bioreactor Systems, which provide working volume from 35mL to 15L in up to 16 bioreactors in parallel. Therefore, the new parallel screening tool not only makes product development more efficient, but also rounds up DASGIP’s existing fermentation and cultivation solutions perfectly.

... more about:
»BioLector »Germany »bioreactor

”Customers using the DASGIP systems will benefit extraordinarily in process development. With the new BioLector they benefit from higher efficiency in earlier phases of their value chain”, Dr. Matthias Arnold, CSO DASGIP. The figure above shows how DASGIP products improve and streamline research and process development.

About DASGIP:

DASGIP AG develops and manufactures technologically advanced Parallel Bioreactor Systems for the cultivation of microbial and mammalian cells at bench top and pilot scale. Process engineers, scientists and product developers from biotechnological, pharmaceutical and chemical companies as well as research institutions use DASGIP Parallel Bioreactor Systems for their biotechnological processes and benefit from increased productivity, high reproducibility, and ease of scale up, resulting in accelerated product development cycles. DASGIP is located in Juelich (Germany) and Shrewsbury MA (USA).

About m2p-labs:

m2p-labs GmbH was founded in November 2005 as a spin off of the department of biochemical engineering and the institute of materials in electrical engineering of the RWTH Aachen University. The company is specialized on micro reaction solutions in biochemical engineering. The first developed product is a unique quantitative micro reactor system for high throughput screening.

Contact:
Jennefer Vogt, DASGIP AG, Tel: +49 2461.980 -118, j.vogt@dasgip.de
DASGIP AG
Rudolf-Schulten-Str. 5
D – 52428 Jülich
Phone: +49 2461.980.0
Fax: +49 2461.980.100
info@dasgip.de

Jennefer Vogt | DASGIP AG
Further information:
http://www.dasgip.com

Further reports about: BioLector Germany bioreactor

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