Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Discovery of HIV’s strategy for multiplying in white blood cells

12.09.2007
The AIDS virus (HIV) attacks immune system cells and once inside them it multiplies. In some of these immune cells, viral stocks are not very accessible to antiviral therapy.

CNRS, Institut Curie and Institut Pasteur researchers investigating how HIV avoids being destroyed by immune cells have discovered that HIV alters the pH of the cellular compartments where it accumulates, thus stopping the activation of the very enzymes that would normally degrade it. This work was published in the 16 August 2007 issue of Cell Host and Microbe.

When viruses or infectious bacteria enter our body, the immune system is triggered to eliminate them, through a process involving various types of white blood cells. Some viruses target the immune system. For example, HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) attacks two sorts of white blood cells: macrophages, which play an early role in immune defense by phagocytosing and then digesting the invader, and certain lymphocytes (CD4 T lymphocytes), which come into play later in the immune response. HIV accumulates in the infected macrophages, which are veritable viral reservoirs pretty much inaccessible to antiviral treatments. Multiplication of HIV destroys the CD4 T lymphocytes.

At the Institut Curie, Philippe Benaroch, CNRS Director of Research, and his Intracellular Transport and Immunity group in the Inserm laboratory (1), have been studying the immune system and how it breaks down. They have investigated the proliferation of HIV in macrophages, in collaboration with their colleagues in the Virus and Immunity Laboratory of the Institut Pasteur associated with the CNRS(2). They have shown that the viral particles accumulate in certain compartments of the infected macrophages. Now, these compartments normally have an acid pH at which HIV shouldn’t survive. But pH measurements have revealed that HIV manages to impair the acidification of these compartments and so create an environment where it can survive and multiply. In these compartments, the enzymes that degrade viruses need an acid pH to work effectively, and so are put out of action by the change in pH produced by HIV. By controlling its environment, HIV can multiply within the infected macrophages, where compartments not containing viral proteins or particles seem to function normally.

... more about:
»Cells »HIV »accumulate »compartments »infected »macrophages

This study sheds new light on how HIV remains infectious for long periods of time in infected patients, and points the way to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the elimination of viral stocks in macrophages.

Catherine Goupillon | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cellhostandmicrobe.com/

Further reports about: Cells HIV accumulate compartments infected macrophages

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
27.03.2017 | Lancaster University

nachricht Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function
27.03.2017 | Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>