Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Drug strategy makes cancer genes get lost in translation

26.01.2007
A new strategy for fighting cancer aims to make its genes get lost in translation, according to a report in the January 26, 2007, issue of the journal Cell, published by Cell Press.

According to the researchers, such a therapy would essentially take advantage of a weakness of the disease: that the majority of growth- and proliferation-related proteins, which cancer depends upon, are encoded by "weak" messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Transcribed from DNA, mRNAs serve as templates for the synthesis of proteins through a process known as translation.

The researchers now report the discovery of a small molecule that targets such weak mRNA, preferentially interrupting its translation into active proteins. As a result, the molecule, called 4EGI-1, effectively silences oncogenes, which have links to cancer. They also found evidence that the small molecule inhibitor exhibits activity against multiple cancer cell lines, including lung and blood cancer cells.

While cancer-promoting proteins may be lost as a result of such treatment, more readily translated "housekeeping" genes--those encoded by "strong" mRNAs that cells need on a regular basis--might continue their activities, said Gerhard Wagner of Harvard Medical School. Therapies targeted at translation might have general use in tackling many forms of cancer, regardless of its genetic origin, given that the uncontrolled growth of cells is a general characteristic of the disease, he added.

The new findings establish a "possible new strategy for cancer therapy," the researchers said. However, they cautioned, the newly described inhibitor is not strong enough for use as a drug in itself. The researchers will next work to chemically modify the inhibitor to enhance its action and screen additional chemical libraries in search of more potent molecules before tests of such a drug in animals could ensue.

Weak mRNAs are translated into proteins less efficiently as a result of long and highly structured, "untranslated regions" at their so-called 5' end, the researchers explained. The lengthy region of weak mRNAs serves as an obstacle for the ribosomal machinery that does the translating, making it a challenge to determine where to begin, he added.

In contrast, strong mRNAs have only short 5' untranslated regions that allow for easier protein formation. The successful translation of weak mRNAs therefore depends more heavily on other protein factors, called initiation factors, to help the process along.

In the current study, the researchers sought to capitalize on the weakness of cancer-related mRNAs by disrupting the interaction between two protein initiation factors, eIF4E and eIF4G.

Assembly of the eIF4E/eIF4G complex is known to have a central role in controlling genes at the level of translation initiation. The complex is normally kept under wraps by still other proteins, the 4E-BPs, which compete with the initiation factors for binding and have tumor-suppressor activity.

The researchers screened thousands of available small molecules for their ability to interfere with the initiation proteins' interaction in a manner similar to the 4E-BPs. The most potent compound identified, 4EGI-1, binds one of the proteins, eIF4E, thereby disrupting the ability of the eIF4E/eIF4G complex to do its job. That interference, in turn, blocked the formation of proteins that require assistance from initiation factors.

"Surprisingly, this compound does not inhibit binding of [the tumor suppressor] 4E-BP1 to eIF4E and instead causes a significant apparent increase in the amount of this protein that is bound," the researchers reported.

Treatment of mammalian cancer cells with the compound had a similar effect on the translation of weak mRNAs to that seen in the initial in vitro tests, they show. What's more, the level of a classic housekeeping gene remained unaffected in treated cells, while expression of two oncogenes, c-Myc and Bcl-xL, declined significantly.

"Our results demonstrate that it is possible to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G using small molecules and to establish a methodology that can readily be used to identify new classes of such inhibitors through the screening of compound libraries," the researchers concluded.

The method could lead to new forms of stand-alone or combination cancer therapies, Wagner said, noting that the strategy is "unusual in that it targets a protein-protein interaction, which has not typically been considered a good drug target."

In addition, they added, small-molecule inhibitors of the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction might serve as a useful chemical genetic tool. They noted that such a tool could be used in researchers' investigation of the translational control of gene expression in various cellular processes, such as cell growth and embryonic development.

Erin Doonan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.cell.com

Further reports about: Inhibitor Initiation Interaction Translation compound eIF4E mRNA

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular libraries for organic light-emitting diodes
24.04.2017 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Fine organic particles in the atmosphere are more often solid glass beads than liquid oil droplets
21.04.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular libraries for organic light-emitting diodes

24.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Research sheds new light on forces that threaten sensitive coastlines

24.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

24.04.2017 | Machine Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>