Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

“Zilch” instead of explosion

16.10.2006
Russian researchers know how to inhibit the hydrogen-aerial mixture explosion or at least to reduce its power significantly. To this end, it is sufficient to add a small amount of special substances - inhibitors –to the potentially dangerous gas mixture.

They are being developed and tested by specialists of two Moscow academic institutes - Institute of Thermal Physics of Extreme Conditions (United Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (ISMAN). By clarifying the mechanism of processes taking place in the course of gas combustion, they are learning to control these processes. The findings are extremely promising.

The most important phase of the investigation has become the ISMAN development of the chain-thermal explosion theory. The theory is based on the prerequisite that chain processes in gas-phase combustion play a determinative role not only at a low pressure but at the atmospheric pressure and a higher one. This theory allowed to find inhibitors, which break off chain avalanche, and therefore, in the long run, reduce explosive power. Such an inhibitor turned out to be the mixture of burning gases - propane, butane and propylene - taken at a defined proportion.

To verify the theory in practice, a special blasting chamber is at the disposal of the researchers. The chamber was made in Severodvinsk by specialists who design submarines, of special ultrastrong armored steel, this ideally spherical chamber is capable of standing an explosion of a ton of trinitrotoluene. No wonder – given the internal diameter of 12 meters, the deviations from this value make no more than 10 millimeters at any point of its surface! It is in this chamber equipped with all necessary facilities that the researchers are making experiments. They do not simply let in a large quantity of hydrogen and air and explode it. They use a special reactor – a cone with piezoelectric sensors and some other measurement instrumentation placed along its surface and at the vertex. It is because the drastic reduction of reaction space (at the vertex of cone) enables to “concentrate” energy of explosion and to achieve maximum high pressure – up to 1,000 atmospheres.

... more about:
»Investigation »chamber »mixture »special

It has turned out that introduction into the hydrogen/air combustible mixture of only 1.5 percent of inhibitory mixture allows to reduce the pressure in the cone by 20 times, and sometimes by 30 times, i.e., actually to suppress the explosion! Instead of blowing up, the dangerous mixture simply burns down – and there is zilch in place of explosion!

Having made sure that it is possible in principle to suppress the explosion chemically, the researchers continue their investigations. They examine reaction mechanisms in more detail, look for new inhibitors, try to reduce their quantity – this is important both in terms of ecological and economic considerations. Besides, the authors have now seriously passed on to search of inhibitors for the air/methane mixtures – the need for such investigations is evident: mines and houses with gas-stoves, alas, continue to blow up.

To make the researchers’ effort more effective, a special building has been erected this year around the chamber, so that the researchers did not have to stiffen on their “barrel” (as they call the blasting chamber among themselves) working during a winter snowstorm in freezing wind.

Nadezda Markina | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

Further reports about: Investigation chamber mixture special

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Hunting pathogens at full force
22.03.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht A 155 carat diamond with 92 mm diameter
22.03.2017 | Universität Augsburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>