Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Substance from green leaves dampens appetite

22.06.2006
Could a substance found in green leaves be used as a means of combating obesity, by being added to various functional foods to keep the consumer feeling full longer? This is the hope of a research team at Lund University in Sweden. They have applied for a patent for their method.

The idea grew out of collaboration between a professor of medicinal and physiological chemistry, Charlotte Erlanson-Albertsson, who does research on obesity and appetite control, and her husband Per-Åke Albertsson, a professor of biochemistry, who does research on photosynthesis in plants.

Their point of departure is that a substance that inhibits the degradation of fat should make fat stay in the intestines longer, thereby creating a longer-lasting feeling of satiety after a meal.

A certain substance in the so-called tylakoids seems to have just such a function. The tylakoids are tiny membranes in the chloroplasts, those parts of a plant cell where photosynthesis takes place. They contain proteins, minerals, and fat.

The two Lund professors started experimenting on themselves last summer. They ate tylakoids and tried to gage whether the feeling of satiety after a meal lasted longer. Then Charlotte Erlanson-Albertsson’s research team went on to run tests where rats were fed a fat-rich diet with and without tylakoid supplements.

The results showed that rats receiving the supplement actually gained less weight. These rats also had lower blood sugar levels and lower blood fats, which­ if the results are the same for humans­ is good for the health. The scientists now plan to move on to experiments on humans on a fat-rich diet and on rats eating a sugar-rich diet.

Spinach provides the leaves the Lund team is using in its experiments.

“But if you were to use raw spinach as a source of tylakoids, you would have to eat about a half a kilo of spinach a day. When we isolate and purify the substance, we only need a few grams. The idea is that it should be possible to add the substance to fat-rich products such as pies or cookies,” says doctoral candidate Rikard Köhnke.

It is not known precisely how tylakoids go about inhibiting the degradation of fat in the intestines. The researchers’ theory is that they form a coating around the drops of fat, so that the enzymes that are meant to cleave the fat cannot do so as rapidly as usual.

Ingela Björck | alfa
Further information:
http://www.lu.se

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Individual Receptors Caught at Work
19.10.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction
19.10.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens

19.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming

19.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>