Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tekes takes part in an extensive stem cell project

04.01.2006


Tekes has allocated three million euros to financing a project by the Tampere-based Regea Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the goal of which is to use stem cells in tissue-related technological applications.



“Stem cell research offers promising opportunities to develop new forms of cellular therapy for diseases formerly difficult to treat. Because of their important potential applications, stem cells have become a key focus of interest in biotechnology,” says Senior Technology Advisor Teppo Tuomikoski.

Regea is becoming a cutting-edge research centre for Tampere, with its strong points in biomaterial expertise, a combination of cellular biology and clinical skills, and with a particular strength in stem cell research. With the help of the new and challenging technologies being developed at Regea, it will be possible to develop entirely new materials and methods for tissue repair. It is believe that the work envisaged will lead to the development and commercialisation of important new products and treatments.


According to Tuomikoski, the work planned at Regea fits in well with Tekes’ new strategy. Tekes sees the great potential of Regea’s expertise, tissue technology and stem cells as of such significance that it has made an exceptionally major contribution to the field, Tuomikoski points out.

The financing will underpin Regea’s status as a nationwide centre of tissue technology

Tekes’ funding in Regea’s operations is focused on work aimed at developing cell culturing expertise and technology, an application aimed at treating injuries to nerve tissue, and the use of stem cells in treating cranial damage.

At present, stem cell lines cultivated around the world are available only for research or animal testing. The working conditions at the Regea Institute for Regenerative Medicine and its GMP-standard laboratory and clean room facilities are of global excellence and they were designed specifically for cultivating stem cell lines suited for human cell transplants. The aim of the first stage of the project is to optimise the growing conditions for stem cells so that the cell lines cultivated will meet GMP requirements and be suited to treating human patients.

In further stages of the project, the aim is to differentiate embryonic stem cells into nerve cells and others, and to combine them with different types of biomaterials. It is hoped this will lead to the development of treatments for diseases of the nervous system and skeletal deficiency conditions. Strong excellence in biomaterials has been developed in Tampere, and Regea performs development of biomaterials in close collaboration with local biomaterial companies and Tampere University of Technology’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering.

The director of Regea, Professor Riitta Suuronen, sees Tekes’ funding as an important indication of the importance of stem cell research and the opportunities it affords. At the same time, the funding will enable the start-up unit to concentrate on long-term research work, Suuronen notes.

Regea Institute for Regenerative Medicine

The Regea Institute for Regenerative Medicine is a separate faculty founded at the University of Tampere in 2005. The founder-members of Regea are the University of Tampere, Tampere University of Technology, the University Hospital in Tampere, Pirkanmaa Polytechnic, and Coxa Hospital for Joint Replacement. Regea is a consortium of five significant research and education institutes whose operations are linked by exploitation of the various technologies required by this field, education, and organisations in which the results can be exploited (including hospitals and companies in the sector). Regea has 30 employees today.

Regea is one of the few cell and tissue technology centres worldwide and the only one in Finland combining expertise in stem cells and biomaterials with tissue bank operations. Regea is specialised in researching and producing new treatments based on the kind of cell and tissue technology which is believed will yield an important new line of treatment in the future to accompany conventional medicine and surgery. It is also a key mission to promote collaboration between various research teams and companies in the fields of research on tissue technology. A major part of Regea is its tissue bank, which started up in the beginning of 2005, and which aims to be Finland’s first establishment to meet the requirements of the new EU directive (2004/23/EC) on tissue banks.

Eeva Ahola | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tekes.fi

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Research team creates new possibilities for medicine and materials sciences
22.01.2018 | Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

nachricht Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent
22.01.2018 | Universität des Saarlandes

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks Wissenschaft & Forschung
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>