Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Stem cell microenvironment reverses malignant melanoma

18.11.2005


Northwestern University researchers have demonstrated how the microenvironments of two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines (federally approved) induced metastatic melanoma cells to revert to a normal, skin cell-like type with the ability to form colonies similar to hESCs. The researchers also showed that these melanoma cells were less invasive following culture on the microenvironments of hESCs.



"Our observations highlight the potential utility of isolating the factors within the hESC microenvironment responsible for influencing tumor cell fate and reversing the cancerous properties of metastatic tumor cells, such as melanoma," said Mary J. C. Hendrix, in whose laboratories at Children’s Memorial Research Center the experiments were conducted.

An article describing the findings by Hendrix and her laboratory group was published in the Nov. 17 online issue of the journal Stem Cells. Hendrix is president and scientific director of the Children’s Memorial Research Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a member of the executive committees of The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Center for Genetic Medicine at Northwestern University. The Northwestern researchers used a unique, three-dimensional model to test whether the microenvironment supporting human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) would influence the behavior of human metastatic melanoma cells – since hESCs have the ability to develop into a variety of normal cell types – to assume a more normal melanocyte-like cell, the skin cell type of origin for melanoma.


The model, which was developed in Hendrix’s laboratories, consists of a three-dimensional collagen matrix preconditioned by hESCs, followed by their removal and subsequent application, or seeding, of metastatic melanoma cells onto the embryonic microenvironment, which was followed by molecular and functional analyses.

The team applied two different hESC lines, independently, onto three-dimensional collagen matrices and allowed the cells to form colonies and precondition their microenvironments for several days. The hESCs were removed and the matrix microenvironments were left intact. Then, human metastatic melanoma cells were seeded onto the hESC-preconditioned matrix microenvironment and were allowed to remain for several days. After this period, the metastatic melanoma cells exposed to the hECS microenvironment were reprogrammed to express a melanocyte-associated protein, called Melan-A, and form colonies similar to the hESC colonies. The melanoma cells reprogrammed by the hESC microenvironment were also less invasive than the tumor cells that had not been exposed to the embryonic matrices.

"These findings offer a new approach to investigating the possible effects of identifying the microenvironmental factors produced by hESCs on reversing the metastatic properties of tumor cells," Hendrix said.

Elizabeth Crown | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.northwestern.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Show me your leaves - Health check for urban trees
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
12.12.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>