Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene expression profile helps predict chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer patients

07.11.2005


A newly identified gene expression profile could help predict how patients with advanced ovarian cancer will respond to chemotherapy treatment. Described in a study in the November 1, 2005 issue of The Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO), the new findings further establish an important role for microarray gene profiling as a predictor of clinical outcome in ovarian cancer, and could eventually provide clinicians with insights into the mechanisms of drug resistance.



"In many patients with advanced ovarian cancer, post-operative treatment with first-line chemotherapy will result in an excellent clinical response," says senior author Stephen A. Cannistra, MD, director of gynecologic oncology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

"However," he adds, "due to the lingering presence of chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells, most patients will unfortunately experience a relapse. The goal of our current research is to help determine which patients will relapse and which will not, and to better understand the reasons for this."


Cannistra’s group has been working to develop a genetic profile of ovarian cancer that will enable clinicians to more accurately determine a patient’s prognosis. As a first step in this process, he and his colleagues last year identified a gene expression profile known as the Ovarian Cancer Prognostic Profile (OCPP), which is predictive of survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. (These study results appear in the December 2004 issue of the JCO.)

Their work makes use of a DNA technology known as microarray analysis, in which genes expressed by cancer cells are labeled and applied to a glass slide containing embedded sequences of thousands of known human genes. The genes that are present in the tumor cell bind to their counterpart sequences on the slide and can then be identified through computer analysis.

In this new study, the authors conducted microarray testing on samples from 60 ovarian cancer patients treated at BIDMC and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to determine if tumor tissue obtained at a patient’s initial diagnosis expressed a gene profile predictive of findings at second-look surgery. (Second-look surgery is currently the most sensitive investigational approach for detecting residual disease in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have achieved a complete clinical remission following chemotherapy, explains Cannistra.)

The expression of 93 genes, collectively referred to as the Chemotherapy Response Profile (CRP), was found to predict which patients would experience a complete response to chemotherapy, as defined by the absence of disease at the time of second-look surgery. The CRP also confirmed the importance of genes such as BAX in this process, which regulate the cell’s response to chemotherapy agents such as paclitaxel.

The authors then went on to compare the results of the CRP and the OCPP. "We found that together these two gene profiles [CRP and OCPP] are a more powerful predictor of a patient’s prognosis than either profile separately," says Cannistra. "This represents the first time that two profiles have been combined to yield such a powerful result in this disease."

One of the most difficult types of cancer to treat, advanced ovarian cancer accounts for approximately 26,000 new cases and 16,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

"Being able to identify the expression pattern of these genes from the original tumor sample [i.e. whether genes were ’turned on’ or ’turned off’] provides us with valuable information about a patient’s prognosis as this type of information cannot always be obtained from standard clinical features, such as tumor grade or residual disease status," notes Cannistra. "And with the identification of each new gene expression profile, we come one step closer to eventually being able to develop treatments tailored to individual ovarian cancer patients."

Coauthors of the study include BIDMC investigators Dimitrios Spentzos, MD, Douglas Levine, MD, Towia A. Libermann, PhD, Shakirahimed Kolia and Hasan Out and Jeff Boyd, PhD, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Bonnie Prescott | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bidmc.harvard.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells
22.02.2017 | Brigham and Women's Hospital

nachricht New insights into the information processing of motor neurons
22.02.2017 | Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>