Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Russian-Style Hunting For Helicobacter Pylori

24.10.2005


Due to the 2005 Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine received by Robin Warren and Barry Marshall, the name of the Helicobacter pylori bacterium is now a buzz word. According to contemporary overview, the bacterium gets into the stomach with food and water. In adverse conditions (stress, malnutrition, genetic factors, etc.), the bacterium invades the wall of the stomach or the duodenum under the mucous membrane and produces toxins destroying the walls. This is how gastritis originates, turning into ulcer.



It is fair to say that the Helicobacter pylori bacterium does not cause gastritis and ulcer with all their hosts. There will always be some percentage of people resistant to some bacterium or virus. But if gastritis or ulcer symptoms are clear, then it is sufficient to determine the Helicobacter pylori presence to start treatment (which is by the way well-developed).

Previously, to diagnose the disease, patients had to endure an extremely unpleasant procedure (gastroscopy) –swallowing a stomach pump. The procedure is not only unpleasant, but also dangerous: it traumatizes the larynx and esophagus. Besides, a stomach pump can bring some infection in the patient’s organism if it has not been properly sterilized.


Researchers from the Branch of the Karpov Physicochemical Research Institute (Obninsk) suggest their own technique for hunting the Helicobacter pylori. The technique is based on the bacterium’s propensity, the bacteria is fond of urea and decomposes it quickly, carbonic acid gas being formed along with that. The patient can be offered some urea and then the content of his/her exhalation can be researched. But the problem is that we always breathe out carbonic acid.

The Obninsk researchers suggest that carbonic acid from urea should be “marked” - the C-14 radioactive isotope of carbon should be introduced in the urea. It is sufficient to add to urea insignificant quantities of the “marked” urea to make the method work. The analysis looks as follows: the patient swallows an ordinary capsule containing a small shot of “Uracaps C-14” preparation. If the Helicobacter pylori lives in the patient’s stomach, it would start to decompose urea intensely. 20 minutes later, the patient is offered to breathe out into the dryer tube (similar to the alcohol test tube). Then special absorption solution washes up the tube content, a little liquid is placed on the plate and the substance activity is observed on the beta-spectrometer. If the patient’s exhalation contains “marked” carbonic acid, the spectrometer would immediately recognize that, and the computer will produce the analysis outcome: whether the bacteria are present in the stomach or not.

“Many people are scared of the word “radioactive”, says Yuri Sorokin. But in this case, we deal with a negligible dose: a capsule of the “Uracaps C-14” preparation is equivalent to a person’s stay in common sunlight for 12 hours. Nevertheless, we are now developing the special “Carbocaps C-13” preparation for children and pregnant women. It contains nonradioactive carbon isotope C-13, but it can be identified in the exhalation only with the help of the NMR-spectrometer .”

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

nachricht Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery
20.01.2017 | GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika

23.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>