Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Drug may hinder recovery from heart attacks

11.11.2004


Some new generation COX-2 inhibitors may not allow heart attack patients to recover fully, research indicates.



Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a basic cellular process the body uses to balance pH in cells--also critical to recovery following a heart attack--is compromised by certain novel COX-2 inhibitors.

Bicarbonate transporters, enzymes critical to maintaining this delicate balance of bicarbonate across the cell membrane, are potently inhibited from doing their work by some clinically used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as celecoxib, the active ingredient in Celebrex.


Celecoxib is an effective anti-inflammatory drug because of its effects on the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The work from the Casey laboratory indicates that the reported side-effects of celecoxib may result from their unintended inhibition of the body’s ability to move bicarbonate. The work was headed up by principal researcher Joe Casey, a University of Alberta physiology professor.

Bicarbonate (HCO3-) is the primary pH buffer of our bodies and the primary waste product of cellular energy production. Movement of the base, HCO3-, into or out of a cell will alkalinize or acidify the cell. Our cells carefully control the concentration and movement of HCO3- across the plasma membrane by regulation of bicarbonate transport proteins (BT) that can rapidly catalyse the transmembrane movement of HCO3-. The focus of Dr. Casey’s laboratory’s research is to understand the processes of transmembrane HCO3- transport at the molecular and cellular levels.

The work will appear in the November 23 issue of Molecular Membrane Biology. Co-researchers included Patricio Morgan, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Casey Research Group, and Claudiu Supuran, of the University of Florence, Dipartimento di Chimica, Laboratorio di Chimica Bioinorganica,Sesto Fiorentino, Italy.

Dr. Casey’s work is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Dr. Casey is a Senior Scholar of the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research.

Michael Robb | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ualberta.ca

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Seeking structure with metagenome sequences
20.01.2017 | DOE/Joint Genome Institute

nachricht Snap, Digest, Respire
20.01.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bodyguards in the gut have a chemical weapon

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

SF State astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet

20.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Treated carbon pulls radioactive elements from water

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>