Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated

20.09.2004


Study published in Science also finds answers to the question: How do cells know to grow?



Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and a collaborator at the University of California at Santa Cruz report they have developed a unique computational approach to investigate a regulatory network for gene expression that is implicated in cell growth and development. The study was published today in the journal Science.

"When studying the genome of any organism, be it yeast, worm, fly or human, scientists are faced with a problem -- the incredible number of genes," explains Susan Mango, Ph.D., an HCI investigator and leader of the research team. Mango’s research centered on a common garden-variety nematode worm, C. elegans, which shares many genes in common with humans. She explains that although worms appear simple, the worm genome is comprised of 20,000 genes. The human genome has over 30,000 genes. "When you look at the numbers, it becomes very clear that the old way -- studying one gene at a time -- is too slow. It becomes a problem of scale, with high throughput the only answer."


Mango’s team used a unique process that combines microarray technology with computational approaches to predict, based on probabilities, where in the genome a particular regulatory sequence might be found. With co-authors Wanyuan Ao, Ph.D.; Jeb Gaudet, Ph.D.; James Kent, Ph.D.; and Srikanth Mattumu, Mango searched C. elegans’s genome to find certain "punctuation marks" in the code that might be regulatory sequences responsible for the growth and development of the worm’s foregut, or pharynx. They were able to identify a total of seven candidate gene sequences; after testing, they discovered that of the seven, five proved to be bona fide regulatory sequences.

"Up to now, identifying transcription factor target genes has been a challenge to biologists. Using our unique algorithm, the Improbizer algorithm developed by James Kent, one of our collaborators, we were able to pick out regulatory sequences, very accurately and quickly," Mango says. "In addition, we also discovered a transcription factor known as DAF-12 that could bind to the regulatory sequence, and is absolutely necessary for the worm pharynx to respond to nutritional cues."

Mango’s work in the future will focus on questions relating to regulatory mechanisms in cell metabolism and cell differentiation, both important avenues of cancer research.

Linda Aagard | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.hci.utah.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular Force Sensors
20.09.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

nachricht Foster tadpoles trigger parental instinct in poison frogs
20.09.2017 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>