Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene expression in liver tumors and patient prognosis

14.09.2004


Liver cancer genes cluster into two subsets that correlate to survival



An analysis of the gene expression patterns of 91 unrelated liver tumors revealed two distinctive subclasses highly associated with patient survival, according to a new study published in the September 2004 issue of Hepatology.
Hepatology, the official journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., is available online via Wiley InterScience at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/hepatology.

The study is among the first to explore the complete molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It identified expression profiles of a limited number of genes that accurately predicted length of patient survival and these findings may open the door to the development of more targeted therapies for liver cancer patients.



While gene technology has previously been applied to some specific aspects of liver cancer, researchers led by Dr. Snorri Thorgeirsson of the NIH’s National Cancer Institute, sought to uncover molecular prognostic indices that could be applied to the overall patient population with HCC. They investigated variations in gene expression in HCC at diagnosis and compared them to patient survival over time.

The researchers examined 91 HCC tissues, 60 matched non-tumor surrounding liver tissues, and 18 normal liver samples. They isolated total RNA to derive complementary DNA and characterized each sample’s gene expression profile. They applied three independent approaches for data analysis to uncover subclasses of HCC and the underlying biological differences between the subclasses.

The study yielded two distinct subclasses of HCC that were highly associated with patient survival and provided new molecular insight into the pathogenesis of HCC. Tumors from the low survival subclass had a strong cell proliferation and antiapoptosis gene expression signatures. They also had higher expression of genes involved in ubiquitination and histone modification, which suggests an involvement of these processes in aggressive HCC.

"Our results indicate that HCC prognosis can be readily predicted from the gene expression profiles of primary tumors," the authors report. Furthermore, they suggest that the unique molecular characteristics of each subclass could be useful in developing new therapies for liver cancer patients.

"Even if a curative therapy for HCC patients cannot be offered at this stage, it may be possible to identify therapeutic targets that can slow the course of disease progression," the authors conclude. "For example, small molecules that inhibit activities of some transcription factors are already available and may provide opportunities to alter the course of HCC progression in both subclass A and B."

An accompanying editorial by Joseph Locker, M.D. of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, underscores the conclusions of the study by Lee et al. and points out that their work has produced an extremely large data set that is a valuable resource for many kinds of studies.

"Lee et al. focused on unsupervised clustering and prognosis, but there are numerous other important questions that could be approached with further analysis of their comprehensive data sets," writes Locker. "Most important, expression profiling will reveal specific targets for rational therapy."

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com
http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/hepatology

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>