Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Protease-inhibitor cocktail protects, increases anti-microbial action of promising new peptide

12.03.2004


The anti-microbial activity of promising peptides shown in laboratory studies to kill several medically important fungi, some of which are resistant to current drugs, can be enhanced further by protecting the peptides from enzymes programmed to destroy them, University at Buffalo oral biologists have found.



A protease inhibitor cocktail containing compounds that inactivate the enzymes that normally would degrade the small pieces of protein enabled the potential treatments for oral infections to more than double their anti-microbial action, results showed.

Guo-xian Wei, D.D.S., postdoctoral associate in the laboratory of Libuse Bobek, Ph.D., professor of oral biology in UB’s School of Dental Medicine, reported the study findings today (March 11, 2004) at the International Association of Dental Research meeting in Hawaii.


One peptide in particular, called MUC7 12-mer, a piece of a larger, naturally occurring human salivary mucin molecule, has shown particular promise for treating drug-resistant fungal strains, Wei said.

Only a few drugs are available to treat these infections, and some fungal organisms already are resistant, presenting a particular problem for patients with depressed immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, organ-transplant patients and chemotherapy patients.

In earlier research in Bobek’s laboratory, MUC7 12-mer killed fungal agents that cause the most common opportunistic infections that threaten these patients -- candidiasis and cryptococcosis. In addition, the peptide was active in very low concentrations, reducing the likelihood of adverse reactions.

However, when the UB researchers tested MUC7 12-mer in saliva, its potency decreased considerably. They theorized that enzymes, or proteases, in the saliva were breaking down the peptide. To test their theory, they exposed the microbes to the peptide in the presence of saliva and a commercially available protease inhibitor cocktail.

Results showed that MUC7 12-mer killed 96 percent to 99 percent of five different fungal strains in the presence of the protease inhibitors. Without the inhibitors, the peptide killed 18 percent, 21 percent and 40 percent of three strains and approximately 74 percent of two strains. "These results confirm our hypothesis that the PIC protects and increases anti-microbial action of this peptide," said Wei. "Our next step is to see if the peptide-protease inhibitor combination performs equally well in an animal model."


Bobek is co-author on the study, which was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York. UB’s more than 27,000 students pursue their academic interests through more than 300 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs.

Lois Baker | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.buffalo.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement
26.06.2017 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

nachricht New insight into a central biological dogma on ion transport
26.06.2017 | Aarhus University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement

26.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Smooth propagation of spin waves using gold

26.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

26.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>