Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists find fully differentiated blood cells remain able to switch identity

16.12.2002


Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have found a new wrinkle in the developmental biology dogma that cell differentiation occurs irreversibly as stem cells give rise to increasingly specialized types of offspring cells. The researchers have shown that certain mouse cells retain an ability to oscillate between very distinct blood cell types -- B-cells and macrophages -- long after what has been commonly regarded as the point of no return.



These latest findings on the phenomenon sometimes referred to as "lineage promiscuity" appear on the Web site of the journal Blood and will be published in the journal’s print edition in March 2003.

"This work reveals that seemingly committed cells have more plasticity than we had thought," said senior author Andrei Thomas-Tikhonenko, assistant professor of pathobiology at Penn. "It appears there is at least a small window where terminally differentiated cells vacillate on which identity to adopt. We suspect that this phenomenon is not limited to B-cells and macrophages in mice."


Pushing mature cells into other lineages may offer a new way to replace cells involved in blood diseases and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists also say this approach offers the potential for converting lymphoma cells that are resistant to treatment into more manageable forms of cancer.

"We found that just two genes, EBF and Pax5, are turned off when B-cells are concerted into macrophages; Pax5 is a known oncogene implicated in the growth of B-cell lymphomas," Thomas-Tikhonenko said. "It’s possible that by targeting this gene with drugs, we may be able to convert malignant B-cell lymphomas into much less harmful histiocytomas, tumors composed of relatively inactive macrophages."

Previous research has demonstrated that when B-cells are transplanted from an animal into a petri dish, the cells sometimes change into macrophages. Thomas-Tikhonenko and colleagues found that when the cells are returned to the animal, they generate spherical B-cell lymphomas, indicating that they have changed their identity yet again. Moreover, the cells could continue oscillating between B-cells and macrophages indefinitely, as many times as they were relocated.

"In other words, ’unfaithful’ cells that have strayed from their original identity can ’come to their senses’ and return to the original lineage," Thomas-Tikhonenko said.

Like all blood cells, B-cells and macrophages descend from hematopoeitic stem cells; however, as members of different families, the two cells do not share a common parent. B-cells arise from a lymphoid progenitor, while macrophages come from a myeloid progenitor.

"Until recently, it was believed that the various cell types of the blood are generated from stem cells in a controlled but irreversible fashion," said James Hagman, an immunology researcher at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver who was not involved in this research. "Now, Dr. Thomas-Tikhonenko and colleagues provide a new example of developmental flexibility. Together with other published results, these observations blur the concept of fixed cell types and provide new insights concerning potential uses for adult stem cells."


Thomas-Tikhonenko was joined in the research by Duonan Yu and Michael H. Goldschmidt of Penn’s Department of Pathobiology, David Allman and John G. Monroe of Penn’s Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Michael L. Atchison of Penn’s Department of Animal Biology. The work was funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Steve Bradt | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.upenn.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Chains of nanogold – forged with atomic precision
23.09.2016 | Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland)

nachricht Self-assembled nanostructures hit their target
23.09.2016 | King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

Im Focus: Complex hardmetal tools out of the 3D printer

For the first time, Fraunhofer IKTS shows additively manufactured hardmetal tools at WorldPM 2016 in Hamburg. Mechanical, chemical as well as a high heat resistance and extreme hardness are required from tools that are used in mechanical and automotive engineering or in plastics and building materials industry. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden managed the production of complex hardmetal tools via 3D printing in a quality that are in no way inferior to conventionally produced high-performance tools.

Fraunhofer IKTS counts decades of proven expertise in the development of hardmetals. To date, reliable cutting, drilling, pressing and stamping tools made of...

Im Focus: Launch of New Industry Working Group for Process Control in Laser Material Processing

At AKL’16, the International Laser Technology Congress held in May this year, interest in the topic of process control was greater than expected. Appropriately, the event was also used to launch the Industry Working Group for Process Control in Laser Material Processing. The group provides a forum for representatives from industry and research to initiate pre-competitive projects and discuss issues such as standards, potential cost savings and feasibility.

In the age of industry 4.0, laser technology is firmly established within manufacturing. A wide variety of laser techniques – from USP ablation and additive...

Im Focus: New laser joining technologies at ‘K 2016’ trade fair

Every three years, the plastics industry gathers at K, the international trade fair for plastics and rubber in Düsseldorf. The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will also be attending again and presenting many innovative technologies, such as for joining plastics and metals using ultrashort pulse lasers. From October 19 to 26, you can find the Fraunhofer ILT at the joint Fraunhofer booth SC01 in Hall 7.

K is the world’s largest trade fair for the plastics and rubber industry. As in previous years, the organizers are expecting 3,000 exhibitors and more than...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Experts from industry and academia discuss the future mobile telecommunications standard 5G

23.09.2016 | Event News

ICPE in Graz for the seventh time

20.09.2016 | Event News

Using mathematical models to understand our brain

16.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Chains of nanogold – forged with atomic precision

23.09.2016 | Life Sciences

New leukemia treatment offers hope

23.09.2016 | Health and Medicine

Self-assembled nanostructures hit their target

23.09.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>