Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lemur produces complex bouquet of scents to seduce mate

25.06.2008
For lemurs, genetic diversity and scent complexity go hand in hand during the breeding season.

This has just been revealed by researchers at Duke University in the United States and the Centre d'écologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (CNRS / Universités Montpellier 1, 2 and 3 / ENSA Montpellier / CIRAD / École pratique des hautes études de Paris).

Male lemurs are able to signal their genetic quality through an olfactory cue. The perfume attracts females and provides the basis for their choice of reproductive partner. This work has just been published online in the journal Molecular Ecology.

Olfaction, little studied in primates until now (1), is a significant means of communication in certain monkeys, and especially in lemurs. These mammals, which live almost exclusively in Madagascar, include more than thirty species. One of the best known is the ring-tailed lemur, Lemur catta, a highly social species that lives in small, female-dominated groups. In this species, olfactory communication plays an essential role in social relations.

... more about:
»lemur »olfactory

Genetic diversity and complexity of scent

The Lemur catta male possesses three sets of glands that produce scent molecules, including scrotal glands on the testicles. Marie Charpentier, researcher at the Centre d'écologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (2), and her colleagues at Duke University (3) were interested in olfactory communication in these primates. They studied the scents released from the glands of 19 adult males living in a semi-free colony at the Duke Lemur Center. They discovered that the chemical diversity of secreted odors was correlated with the genetic diversity of the individual. The greater a male's genetic diversity (the more heterozygous (4) he is), the more complex his olfactory message (the scent molecules are released more frequently and abundantly).

Surprisingly, this phenomenon is only observed during the breeding season, a relatively stressful time for males who are in competition for females. The females, for their part, have to make a good reproductive choice, and to this end, they pick out the males that are the most heterozygous -- a sign of health -- by their ability to diffuse a complex bouquet of scents. This signal enables females to evaluate the genetic worth of males and to choose the one with the best qualities to pass on to offspring.

Another important result: the less related two males are in terms of their scent, the less they are related genetically as well. The olfactory signal therefore carries a second message of how closely two individuals are related. Again, this correlation is only detectable during the breeding season, precisely when individuals are in competition.

Julien Guillaume | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cnrs-dir.fr

Further reports about: lemur olfactory

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>