Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mouthwash to Fight Cancer?

21.03.2013
Oral disinfectants induce apoptosis in human oral tumor cells

Patients who suffer from gingivitis are often advised to use disinfectant mouthwashes. In the future, the active ingredients in these products could be used in a completely different area: As scientists have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chlorhexidin and Alexidin increase programmed cell death and may be effective against cancers of the mouth and throat.

Sometimes researchers discover that established drugs have other effects in addition to those for which they were actually approved. For example acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) has commonly been used to treat pain and fever; more recently, however, it has also been prescribed to thrombosis-prone patients as a blood thinner.

A team headed by Thorsten Berg is now convinced that many low-molecular drugs already in use demonstrate previously unrecognized activity toward interactions between proteins, which may be of therapeutic use.

The team of scientists from the University of Leipzig, the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, the Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, the Helmholtz Center Munich, the Technical University Munich, and the ETH Zurich were out to use a protein–protein interaction relevant for human health to demonstrate the interactions between two proteins whose interaction controls apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Both proteins are from the same protein family. The first protein, Bad, initiates apoptosis-promoting protein to inhibit it.

The researchers proceeded to screen a collection of over 4000 substances known as a compound library. The majority of the compounds in the library are small molecules in clinical use. Binding experiments were used to determine which of the substances inhibit the binding of the two target proteins. To determine the specificity of the "hits", their effects on other protein–protein interactions were also tested.

Berg and his co-workers were successful: Chlorhexidin, the active component in commercial oral disinfectants such as Chlorhexamed, Chlorhexal, Periogard, Corsodyl, and Chlorohex; as well as Alexidin, the active component in Esemdent, both inhibit the binding of the apoptosis inhibitor to the apoptosis trigger. Chlorhexidin's effect is specific, while Alexidin has additional very weak effects on other proteins.

Why are apoptosis proteins interesting? Apoptosis is decreased in tumor cells, so the cells do not die off and continue to divide. One reason for this is that they produce too much of the apoptosis-inhibiting protein. In experiments with cultures of cells from various tongue and throat carcinomas, both compounds caused increased apoptosis. This effect is much stronger in the cancer cells than in healthy cells. It may be possible to use these drugs in therapeutic applications.

The researchers hope to find other protein-protein interactions that could be targeted with approved small-molecule drugs.

About the Author
Dr. Thorsten Berg is Professor for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology at the University of Leipzig. His research is focused on the development of new concepts for modulating protein protein interactions by small organic molecules. To do so, his research group utilizes an interdisciplinary approach based on chemical and biological methods.
Author: Thorsten Berg, Universität Leipzig (Germany), http://www.uni-leipzig.de/%7etberg/
Title: Oral Disinfectants Inhibit Protein–Protein Interactions Mediated by the Anti-Apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL and Induce Apoptosis in Human Oral Tumor Cells

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201208889

Thorsten Berg | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/%7etberg/
http://pressroom.angewandte.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The herbivore dilemma: How corn plants fights off simultaneous attacks
09.02.2016 | Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research

nachricht Shedding Light on Bacteria
09.02.2016 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wbp2 is a novel deafness gene

Researchers at King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom have for the first time demonstrated a direct link between the Wbp2 gene and progressive hearing loss. The scientists report that the loss of Wbp2 expression leads to progressive high-frequency hearing loss in mouse as well as in two clinical cases of children with deafness with no other obvious features. The results are published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.

The scientists have shown that hearing impairment is linked to hormonal signalling rather than to hair cell degeneration. Wbp2 is known as a transcriptional...

Im Focus: From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes

Pollens, the bane of allergy sufferers, could represent a boon for battery makers: Recent research has suggested their potential use as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.

"Our findings have demonstrated that renewable pollens could produce carbon architectures for anode applications in energy storage devices," said Vilas Pol, an...

Im Focus: Automated driving: Steering without limits

OmniSteer project to increase automobiles’ urban maneuverability begins with a € 3.4 million budget

Automobiles increase the mobility of their users. However, their maneuverability is pushed to the limit by cramped inner city conditions. Those who need to...

Im Focus: Microscopy: Nine at one blow

Advance in biomedical imaging: The University of Würzburg's Biocenter has enhanced fluorescence microscopy to label and visualise up to nine different cell structures simultaneously.

Fluorescence microscopy allows researchers to visualise biomolecules in cells. They label the molecules using fluorescent probes, excite them with light and...

Im Focus: NASA's ICESat-2 equipped with unique 3-D manufactured part

NASA's follow-on to the successful ICESat mission will employ a never-before-flown technique for determining the topography of ice sheets and the thickness of sea ice, but that won't be the only first for this mission.

Slated for launch in 2018, NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) also will carry a 3-D printed part made of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK),...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AKL’16: Experience Laser Technology Live in Europe´s Largest Laser Application Center!

02.02.2016 | Event News

From intelligent knee braces to anti-theft backpacks

26.01.2016 | Event News

DATE 2016 Highlighting Automotive and Secure Systems

26.01.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fossils Turn Out to Be a Rich Source of Information

09.02.2016 | Earth Sciences

Shedding Light on Bacteria

09.02.2016 | Life Sciences

Hunting pressure on forest animals in Africa is on the increase

09.02.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>