Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Moffitt researcher says no survival advantage with peripheral blood stem cells versus bone marrow

19.10.2012
Moffitt Cancer Center Researcher, Colleagues Say Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplants from Unrelated Donors Associated with Higher Rates of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host-Disease

Claudio Anasetti, M.D., chair of the Department of Blood & Marrow Transplant at Moffitt Cancer Center, and colleagues from 47 research sites in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network conducted a two-year clinical trial comparing two-year survival probabilities for patients transplanted with peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow stem cells from unrelated donors.

The goal was to determine whether graft source, peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow, affects outcomes in unrelated donor transplants for patients with leukemia or other hematologic malignancies.

Fifty transplant centers in the United States and Canada participated in this phase III study, which randomized 278 patients to receive bone marrow and 273 patients to receive peripheral blood stem cells as the graft source for transplant. The results of the study are in the Oct. 18 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

According to the trial analyses, there were no observed differences in overall survival, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or acute graft-versus-host disease (GHVD) between the patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow stem cells from unrelated donors. GVHD is a serious and often deadly post-transplant complication that occurs when the newly transplanted donor cells attack the transplant recipient’s body. While engraftment was faster in patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells, there was a higher incidence of overall chronic GVHD in these patients (53 percent) than in those transplanted with bone marrow stem cells (40 percent). Patients receiving transplants of peripheral blood stem cells from unrelated donors also had a higher incidence of chronic GVHD affecting multiple organs (46 percent) than patients who received bone marrow stem cells (31 percent).
“Although peripheral blood stem cells from related donors have demonstrated clinical benefits, our trial demonstrates that when these stem cells originate from unrelated donors, they are not superior to bone marrow stem cells in terms of patient survival, and they increase the risk for chronic GVHD,” said Anasetti, lead study author. “More effective strategies to prevent GVHD are needed to improve outcomes for all patients receiving unrelated donor transplants.”

Peripheral blood stem cells are stem cells originally found in the bone marrow that have been moved into the blood stream by a special regimen of drugs. Unlike bone marrow stem cells, which must be extracted from the bones in an operating room, peripheral blood stem cells are more easily obtained through apheresis, a process similar to regular blood donation, which collects the peripheral blood stem cells through a tube inserted in a vein. A critical step before the transplant involves finding a donor that is tissue matched to the recipient.
About one-third of patients who need a peripheral blood stem cell or bone marrow transplant for treatment of leukemia or another blood disease are able to secure a related donor. According to the National Marrow Donor Program, for the 70 percent who cannot find a donor within their family, most will be able to find an unrelated donor. Because the majority of transplant patients need cells from unrelated donors, it’s necessary to better understand the risks associated with transplants of unrelated donor cells.

Clinical trials on related donor transplants have demonstrated that peripheral blood stem cell transplants in patients with leukemia and other blood diseases result in better engraftment, lower relapse rates, and increased survival compared with transplants with bone marrow stem cells. However, those trials also found that peripheral blood stem cell transplants carry an increased risk of GVHD. Patients who survive early post-transplant may develop chronic GVHD, a disabling condition managed with long-term immunosuppressant therapy.

Many transplant centers are increasingly using peripheral blood stem cells as a source for adult stem cells because of their superiority in clinical trials that have directly compared outcomes between peripheral blood stem cells and bone marrow stem cells from related donors. However, there has not been a comparative study of the two transplant sources that has prospectively analyzed patient outcomes in unrelated donor transplants.

The study was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (U10HL069294), the National Cancer Institute and the National Marrow Donor Program.

About Moffitt Cancer Center
Located in Tampa, Moffitt is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, a distinction that recognizes Moffitt’s excellence in research, its contributions to clinical trials, prevention and cancer control. Since 1999, Moffitt has been listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of “America’s Best Hospitals” for cancer. With more than 4,200 employees, Moffitt has an economic impact on the state of nearly $2 billion. For more information, visit MOFFITT.org, and follow the Moffitt momentum on Facebook, twitter and YouTube.

Media release by Florida Science Communications

Kim Polacek | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.moffitt.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections
25.09.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity
22.09.2017 | DFG-Forschungszentrum für Regenerative Therapien TU Dresden

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

An international team of physicists a coherent amplification effect in laser excited dielectrics

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

25.09.2017 | Trade Fair News

Highest-energy cosmic rays have extragalactic origin

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>