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Melon's Role in Fruit Genetics

27.06.2011
The melon fruit is an important crop and a model system for studying the genetics of fruit development. Characteristics of melon fruits vary greatly. The purpose of this work was to enhance the study of gene expression during fruit development and ripening of melon fruits, and discover the genes that determine fruit quality traits.

A team of researchers from the Agricultural Research Organization of Israel in collaboration from Evogene, Israel, report a method to obtain high quality ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA acts as a messenger carrying instructions from DNA responsible for the combination of proteins, which determine traits.

One major factor that determines the precision of this method is the quality of the genetic material used in research. Often, an amplification process is used to obtain the required quantities of genetic material when the source tissue is limited. However, a single round of this process can greatly distort the data.

Non-amplified data was gathered in the reported study to obtain an accurate representation of gene expression during fruit development in the fleshy melon fruit. Nurit Katzir, a researcher from the Agricultural Research Organization of Israel, explained that the results from this study indicate high-quality genetic information for future research can be obtained from mature fleshy fruits. This is significant, as these fruits are notorious for difficulties in accurate genetic extraction.

The data obtained in this study was validated by a comparative amplification process, and is currently being used to identify the genes responsible for traits of melon fruits, such as their development, ripening, and overall quality.

The research was supported by the Office of the Chief Scientist in the Israeli Ministry of Industry, Trade, and Labor through Magnet Program and the Israeli Bio-TOV Consortium. The full article was published in the latest issue of The Plant Genome.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at https://www.crops.org/publications/tpg/articles/4/1/36.

The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), founded in 1955, is an international scientific society comprised of 6,000+ members with its headquarters in Madison, WI. Members advance the discipline of crop science by acquiring and disseminating information about crop breeding and genetics; crop physiology; crop ecology, management, and quality; seed physiology, production, and technology; turfgrass science; forage and grazinglands; genomics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology; and biomedical and enhanced plants.

CSSA fosters the transfer of knowledge through an array of programs and services, including publications, meetings, career services, and science policy initiatives. For more information, visit www.crops.org

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.sciencesocieties.org
http://www.crops.org

Further reports about: Genetics Israeli RNA fresh fruit genetic material molecular genetic

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