Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

High-res view of zinc transport protein

15.09.2009
Reveals shape-shifting atomic interactions; suggests mechanism and possible drug targets

How much difference can a tenth of a nanometer make? When it comes to figuring out how proteins work, an improvement in resolution of that miniscule amount can mean the difference between seeing where atoms are and understanding how they interact.

Case in point: New, improved-resolution views of a zinc transporter protein deciphered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provide not just a structure but also a suggested mechanism for how cells sense and regulate zinc, an element that is essential for life, but which must be kept at a steady state to avoid problems like seizures, diabetes, and possibly Alzheimer's disease.

The new findings, to be published online on September 13, 2009, by Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, also suggest targets for zinc-regulating drugs, and may even advance the understanding of similar zinc-regulating enzymes in plant chloroplasts with possible implications for biofuel production.

"Our goal is to reveal atomic interactions in a protein structure to understand the chemistry that underlies the protein's biological function," said Brookhaven biologist Dax Fu, who led the research. "With this structure, we can begin to understand the mechanism of zinc transport at a chemical level."

The structure was revealed using x-ray crystallography at Brookhaven Lab's [http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/] National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a source of intense x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light. By studying how x-rays bounce off crystallized samples of a protein, scientists can reconstruct the location and orientation of the protein's atoms in three dimensions.

The Brookhaven team had previously used NSLS to solve a zinc transporter protein structure at lower resolution*. To achieve the new-and-improved structure, the scientists added mercury atoms to stabilize protein packing in the crystals. This increased the resolution of their x-ray vision by a mere angstrom (tenth of a nanometer). But because it brought the overall resolution of their structure to just below 3 angstroms — the point at which individual atoms begin to become visible — it enabled the scientists to see the protein in action as it bound to and transported zinc ions.

Using fluorescent probes, the scientists also studied how the protein changed shape in response to zinc binding. And they tested how changes to structural elements of the zinc transporter protein would affect its ability to transport zinc.

Together, these experiments suggest an auto-regulatory mechanism for zinc transport: Zinc binding within the cell triggers hinge-like movements of two electrically repulsive portions of the protein that lie within the cell's interior, which results in a conformational change in the portion of the protein that traverses the cellular membrane. So when zinc levels inside the cell rise too high, this shape shifting somehow pushes zinc ions through the membrane and out of the cell.

"Exactly how the protein pushes the zinc ions through the membrane has yet to be determined," said Fu, who added that this will be a focus of future research.

Conceivably, he added, drugs that bind to the zinc-sensing portions of the protein could be used to modulate zinc transport activity and help adjust zinc levels as possible treatments for diseases such as seizure disorders or diabetes. Brookhaven Science Associates, which manages Brookhaven Lab, has filed a patent application related to this work.

In addition, because other metal transporting proteins share similar architecture with the zinc transporter protein, the findings from this study may advance the understanding of other medical disorders linked to metal imbalance, as well as the development of possible treatments for those conditions.

Furthermore, this work may have implications for researchers trying to improve the prospects of biomass production in plants, an essential component to the development of biofuels. Zinc is an essential co-factor in a host of reactions in chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. But as is the case in animals, excess metals can be highly toxic in plants. Consequently, studies to help elucidate zinc-transporter protein function could help scientists understand how plants maintain the delicate balance needed for ideal growth.

Future studies of protein structures at Brookhaven Lab promise to reveal even greater mechanistic detail when a new light source, known as NSLS-II, opens in 2015. That facility, now under construction, will be 10,000 times brighter than NSLS. That boost in brightness — and therefore resolution — would be particularly important in the study of membrane proteins, which represent the vast majority of proteins of interest to those developing drugs, but which are also often difficult to crystallize.

"As illustrated by this study, even small improvements in x-ray diffraction resolution can greatly advance our mechanistic understanding of protein function," said Fu.

This research was performed at beamline X25A at the NSLS. The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, DOE's Office of Science (Office of Basic Energy Sciences), and by the Biology Department at Brookhaven Lab.

Related Links

* Previous News Release: Zinc Transporter Protein Structure Deciphered: http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=07-89

One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers. Brookhaven is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates, a limited-liability company founded by the Research Foundation of State University of New York on behalf of Stony Brook University, the largest academic user of Laboratory facilities, and Battelle, a nonprofit, applied science and technology organization.

Visit Brookhaven Lab's electronic newsroom for links, news archives, graphics, and more: http://www.bnl.gov/newsroom

Karen McNulty Walsh | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bnl.gov
http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=07-89
http://www.bnl.gov/newsroom

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
24.03.2017 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

nachricht How cheetahs stay fit and healthy
24.03.2017 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>