Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Glanville fritillary genome sequenced at the University of Helsinki

05.09.2014

The Glanville fritillary has long been an internationally known model species for ecology and evolutionary biology, whose population biology has been studied on the Åland Islands for more than twenty years.

 Now the species has become even more significant. Led by Research Professor Ilkka Hanski, the Metapopulation Research Group (MRG) at the University of Helsinki has sequenced the full genome of the Glanville fritillary together with three groups from the Institute of Biotechnology at the same university.


This is a Granville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia).

Credit: Tari Haahtela

Before the sequencing of the Glanville fritillary genome, which is approximately 390 million base pairs long, the only genomes sequenced in Finland were those of viruses and bacteria. After the silk moth and longwing, the Glanville fritillary is now the third species of butterfly for which both the sequence of its full genome and a high-resolution genetic map is available. The map displays the location of approximately 16,000 genes in the species' 31 chromosomes.

The study also confirms the hypothesis that the ancestral lepidopteran species had 31 chromosomes, as originally proposed by Esko Suomalainen, professor of genetics at the University of Helsinki in the 1960s.

"The most astonishing thing is that it seems like the genes have stayed in the same chromosomes practically throughout the evolutionary history of butterflies –at least for 140 million years. Such stability is nearly unique among all organisms. What is even more surprising is that even though some chromosomes have fused during the lepidopteran evolution, the genes remain on their own side of the chromosome even after chromosomal fusions," explains group leader Mikko Frilander of the Institute of Biotechnology, who participated in the study.

Originally consisting of ecologists, MRG focused heavily on genome sequencing, as its objective is to combine genetic and genomic research with its strong ecological and evolutionary biological research.

"We want the Glanville fritillary to become a new model species for integrative biology. The next challenge is to get more biologists interested in the species," states Research Professor Ilkka Hanski.

The sequencing of the Glanville fritillary genome was a four-year project, funded by the European Research Council and the Academy of Finland.

Most of the sequencing was conducted on the Viikki Campus, at the Institute of Biotechnology of the University of Helsinki, under the supervision of Petri Auvinen. Genome assembly was the responsibility of Panu Somervuo of MRG and Leena Salmela from the Department of Computer Science. Gene annotation and predicting their function was conducted by Virpi Ahola from MRG together with Liisa Holm, professor in bioinformatics, and Patrik Koskinen.

The high-resolution genetic map for the Glanville fritillary was constructed using a tool developed by Pasi Rastas, from MRG.

Ilkka Hanski | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.helsinki.fi

Further reports about: Biotechnology Genome Helsinki ancestral bacteria chromosomes ecological fritillary genes genomic moth silk species viruses

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
24.05.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines
24.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>