Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fox Chase Researchers Discover Novel Role of the NEDD9 Gene in Early Stages of Breast Cancer

15.01.2013
Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Many of these deaths occur when there is an initial diagnosis of invasive or metastatic disease.

A protein called NEDD9—which regulates cell migration, division and survival—has been linked to tumor invasion and metastasis in a variety of cancers. Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have now shown that NEDD9 plays a surprising role in the early stages of breast tumor development by controlling the growth of progenitor cells that give rise to tumors.

The findings, published in the journal Oncogene on January 14, 2013, could lead to personalized treatment strategies for women with breast cancer based on the levels of NEDD9 in their tumors.

"For several years, NEDD9 has been linked to tumor metastasis and invasion at later stages. This is the first study that really shows how important NEDD9 can be for the initiation of tumors in breast cancer, and to link this initiation process to progenitor cells," says lead study author Joy Little, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at Fox Chase who works in the laboratory of senior study investigator Erica A. Golemis, PhD, Deputy Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President at Fox Chase.

In the study, Little, Golemis and their collaborators mated mice without the NEDD9 gene to mice engineered to develop HER2+ mammary tumors and unexpectedly found that these mice were largely resistant to tumor formation. Only 18% of the mice developed mammary tumors, compared with 80% of mice that had a functional NEDD9 gene. In contrast to previous research findings showing that an increase in NEDD9 levels promotes tumor aggressiveness, the researchers found that loss of NEDD9 had little effect on tumor metastasis, indicating that it is not required for this process in this specific context. Once formed, the tumors in mice lacking NEDD9 grew rapidly, suggesting that it either plays a less important role at later stages of tumor growth or tumors undergo compensatory changes that allow them to bypass the need for NEDD9.

Importantly, mice lacking NEDD9 showed a significant reduction in progenitor cell populations in the mammary gland compared with mice that had a functional NEDD9 gene. Progenitor cells from NEDD9-null mice were less likely to form three-dimensional mammospheres in culture, but proliferated at the same rate as cells from control mice. The loss of Nedd9 also made progenitor cells more sensitive to lower doses of two tumor-inhibiting drugs—a Food and Drug Administration-approved Src inhibitor called dasatinib, and a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor from a class of drugs currently being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. These findings suggest that these types of drugs would more effectively control breast cancer tumors with low levels of NEDD9.

"Eventually, with a biopsy, you may be able to get a read-out of all the mutations that a tumor has, and each one would potentially dictate whether or not a certain line of therapy would work for a specific tumor," Little says. "If NEDD9 levels are higher in a particular tumor, we could potentially determine whether or not it would be more sensitive to specific inhibitors."

To follow up on this work, the researchers plan to determine the mechanisms by which NEDD9 controls tumor formation, and examine whether NEDD9 plays a similar role in early stages of other types of cancer.

Co-authors on the study include Victoria Serzhanova, Eugene Izumchenko, Brian L. Egleston, Andres J. Klein-Szanto, and Maria Shubina of Fox Chase; Erica Parise of the University of Pittsburgh; Grace Loudon of Bryn Mawr College; Sachiko Seo and Mineo Kurokawa of the University of Tokyo; and Michael F. Ochs of Johns Hopkins University.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, part of the Temple University Health System, is one of the leading cancer research and treatment centers in the United States. Founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as one of the nation’s first cancer hospitals, Fox Chase was also among the first institutions to be designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1974. Fox Chase researchers have won the highest awards in their fields, including two Nobel Prizes. Fox Chase physicians are also routinely recognized in national rankings, and the Center’s nursing program has received the Magnet status for excellence three consecutive times. Today, Fox Chase conducts a broad array of nationally competitive basic, translational, and clinical research, with special programs in cancer prevention, detection, survivorship, and community outreach. For more information, call 1-888-FOX-CHASE or 1-888-369-2427.

Diana Quattrone | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fccc.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
23.01.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>