Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Female bonobos start up early

28.07.2014

Onset of puberty in female bonobos precedes that of chimpanzees

Puberty is the threshold between childhood and adulthood. Behavior and appearance change considerably during this period – not only in humans but also in our closest relatives, the great apes.


The five-year-old female Bonobo Solea (left) lives in LuiKotale, Democratic Republic of Congo. Maimouna (left), a five-year-old female chimpanzee, lives in the Taï National Park, Ivory coast.

© Solea: Sean Lee, LKBP; Maimouna: Liran Samuni

In a current study researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have investigated at which age bonobos and chimpanzees, the closest living relatives of humans, enter puberty.

In order to determine the onset of puberty the researchers measured the concentration of the hormone testosterone which rapidly increases when male and female primates reach sexual maturity. They found that in males of both species urinary testosterone levels increase at an age of about eight years.

Female chimpanzees showed a similar increase at a slightly older age. Female bonobos, however, were found to enter puberty already with five years of age. This is surprising since bonobos are known to be late bloomers whose developmental processes tend to be delayed or take longer in comparison to chimpanzees.

During puberty, rising hormone levels stimulate somatic growth and the development of secondary sex characteristics, and the child becomes a grown-up individual. The timing of puberty depends, among others, on environmental conditions, nutrition and social factors. From a biological point of view puberty is the starting signal for the race of passing on one’s own genes to future generations. While pubertal changes in humans and male chimpanzees have been well investigated, this has not been the case so far for bonobos and female chimpanzees.

In their current study researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have measured the concentrations of testosterone in the urine of 42 male and 97 female chimpanzees and of 48 male and 64 female bonobos. They found that female bonobos enter puberty around three years earlier than female chimpanzees and males of both species. “Given the early onset of puberty, one would predict to assume that female bonobos give birth to their first child earlier than chimpanzees. Yet, this does not seem to be the case“, says Verena Behringer, researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and first author of the study.

In contrast to most other primates, young female chimpanzees and bonobos leave their birth group when they reach sexual maturity. Entering a novel range and exposure to an unfamiliar social environment bears high potential costs for the young female.  Especially in chimpanzees this is not always easy because food is limited and each additional group member’s needs may raise competition. The social pressure is partially compensated by the fact that young females become more attractive to males. This motivates chimpanzee males to protect female newcomers against the aggressive behavior of other female group members.

In bonobos, female teenagers start their search for a new group between two and three years earlier than female chimpanzees. In contrast to them, female bonobos joining a new community encounter curiosity rather than aggression. “Possible advantages from entering puberty earlier are a greater search area for a new group and more time to obtain social experiences and to develop their sexuality”, says Verena Behringer. “The latter is a central element in the behavioral repertoire of bonobos which helps to solve conflicts, and establish friendly relations with others.”

The urine samples used for this study came from apes living in zoos. Therefore, the nutritional status can be excluded as a reason for the time discrepancy between both species. “The earlier onset of puberty in bonobos seems to be a characteristic feature that emerged during the evolutionary development of both sister species“, says Verena Behringer.

Contact 

Sandra Jacob

Press and Public Relations

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig

Phone: +49 341 3550-122

 

Original publication

 
V. Behringer, T. Deschner, C. Deimel, J.M.G. Stevens, G. Hohmann
Age-related changes in urinary testosterone levels suggest differences in puberty onset and divergent life history strategies in bonobos and chimpanzees
Hormones and Behavior, 28 July 2014 (DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2014.07.011)

Dr. Verena Behringer | Max-Planck-Institute
Further information:
http://www.mpg.de/8326482/female-bonobos-puberty

Further reports about: Evolutionary chimpanzees female hormone levels species testosterone

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Killer sea snail a target for new drugs
07.07.2015 | University of Queensland

nachricht First images of dolphin brain circuitry hint at how they sense sound
07.07.2015 | Emory Health Sciences

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Surfing a wake of light

Researchers observe and control light wakes for the first time

When a duck paddles across a pond or a supersonic plane flies through the sky, it leaves a wake in its path. Wakes occur whenever something is traveling...

Im Focus: Light-induced Magnetic Waves in Materials Engineered at the Atomic Scale

Researchers explore ultrafast control of magnetism across interfaces: A new study discovers how the sudden excitation of lattice vibrations in a crystal can trigger a change of the magnetic properties of an atomically-thin layer that lies on its surface.

A research team, led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter at CFEL in Hamburg, the University of Oxford, and the...

Im Focus: Viaducts with wind turbines, the new renewable energy source

Wind turbines could be installed under some of the biggest bridges on the road network to produce electricity. So it is confirmed by calculations carried out by a European researchers team, that have taken a viaduct in the Canary Islands as a reference. This concept could be applied in heavily built-up territories or natural areas with new constructions limitations.

The Juncal Viaduct, in Gran Canaria, has served as a reference for Spanish and British researchers to verify that the wind blowing between the pillars on this...

Im Focus: X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time

New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions

A new technique pioneered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real...

Im Focus: Iron: A biological element?

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and a half billion years ago.

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine in Leipzig: Last chance to submit abstracts until 2 July

25.06.2015 | Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine: Abstract Submission has been extended to 24 June

16.06.2015 | Event News

MUSE hosting Europe’s largest science communication conference

11.06.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Down to the quantum dot

07.07.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

Tundra study uncovers impact of climate warming in the Arctic

07.07.2015 | Earth Sciences

Transition from 3 to 2 dimensions increases conduction, MIPT scientists discover

07.07.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>