Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dating by Electrode

14.07.2014

Voltammetry of microparticles used to date archeological artifacts made of copper and bronze

How can the age of archeological objects be determined if the well-established carbon dating method does not apply, for example for metal objects? Spanish and Portuguese scientists have now introduced a technique for dating artifacts made of copper and bronze. Presented in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their electroanalytical method is based on the voltammetry of microparticles. It compares various corrosion products that form over long periods of time and works with only a few nanograms of material so it causes almost no damage.


Voltammetric experiments produce current–voltage curves that have characteristic shapes for many compounds. In order to date copper-containing, archaeological finds, a team led by Antonio Doménech-Carbó at the University of Valencia examined the ratios of two different copper oxides, tenorite and cuprite, that can be differentiated and quantified based on their voltammetric curves.

When they are exposed to air, copper surfaces become covered by a natural layer of cuprite (Cu2O). Over time, this layer is slowly converted to other products of corrosion. As copper-containing objects age in a slightly corrosive environment, without contact with soils or sea air, a layer of tenorite (CuO) continuously forms over the primary cuprite patina. This occurs because cuprite reacts with oxygen from the air to preferentially form tenorite in an atmosphere containing CO2 or in the presence of calcareous materials. Examination of copper coins by scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the presence of cuprite and tenorite.

To carry out the electroanalytical experiments, the researchers impregnate a graphite bar electrode with paraffin and dab the surface of the artifact with it. A few nanograms of the sample surface stick to the electrode, which is then dipped into an aqueous electrolyte. This causes almost no damage to the object. Copper oxide microparticles result in very characteristic peaks in the resulting current–voltage curves.

Of particular interest to the researchers is the ratio of the current peaks for tenorite and cuprite. It shows a steady increase with increasing corrosion time, as demonstrated with a series of antique coins from various collections, including the Prehistory Museums of València and Xàtiva (Spain), as well as the artificial ageing of Euro cent coins made of copper. The researchers were able to use the coins to establish a calibration curve that can be used to date objects of unknown age.

The voltammetric dating of a water pitcher from the Caliphal period and a Montefortino helmet from the Roman age gave ages of 1050±80 and 2150±150 years, respectively, which agree well with dates previously established from the archaeological context.

About the Author

Dr. Antonio Doménech-Carbó is Professor at the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, Spain. His research field is electrochemistry, in particular focused on electroanalytical methods for archaeometry, conservation, and restoration of cultural heritage.

Author: Antonio Doménech-Carbó, Universitat de València (Spain), http://www.uv.es/uvweb/analytical-chemistry-department/en/administrative-technical-staff/organisation-chart-1285859984083.html

Title: Dating Archaeological Copper/Bronze Artifacts by Using the Voltammetry of Microparticles

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201404522

Antonio Doménech-Carbó | Angewandte Chemie

Further reports about: Dating X-ray ageing archaeological artificial copper damage electrode microparticles

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersensitive through quantum entanglement

28.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under real ambient pressure conditions

28.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Mice provide insight into genetics of autism spectrum disorders

28.06.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>