Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Children and adolescents with ADHD - Brain injuries are less frequent when taking medication

17.03.2015

Children and adolescents suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a lower risk of traumatic brain injury when taking methylphenidate or atomoxetine. This was shown in a longitudinal study of ADHD in children and adolescents in Germany performed by the Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS and funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Results of the project have now been published in the American journal JAMA Pediatrics.

It is well known that people with ADHD suffer more often from accidental injuries such as fractures, head injuries, burns, and poisoning. However, until now, there was no clear evidence that therapy with methylphenidate or atomoxetine could reduce the increased risk of injury.

Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research investigated this question in their study of children and adolescents with ADHD.

The study was based on the German Pharmacoepidemiological research database (GePaRD) with data from about 17 million insured persons from four statutory health insurance providers in Germany. The researchers identified 37,650 children and adolescents between the ages of three and 17 years newly diagnosed with ADHD in 2005 and 2006.

In this group, which was followed until 2009, 2,128 children and adolescents were hospitalized for injuries, including 821 with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury.

For the 2,128 children and adolescents treated with an injury in hospital, the researchers recorded all prescriptions of methylphenidate and atomoxetine. It was found that just over half of them received a prescription of methylphenidate or atomoxetine during the observation period; 92 percent of the prescriptions were for methylphenidate. The researchers then compared the general risk of an injury or a traumatic brain injury under drug treatment during the observation period to the risk without treatment.

It was found that during drug treatment the probability of being admitted to hospital for traumatic brain injury was lower by 34 percent. However, if all injuries resulting in hospitalization were considered, the risk reduction did not reach statistical significance.

Prof. Dr. Edeltraut Garbe, head of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at BIPS, explains: "Our study results indicate that children and adolescents with ADHD have a lower risk of traumatic brain injury if they are treated with methylphenidate or atomoxetine. Whether this is true for accidental injuries in general must be investigated further - our study suggests, but could not prove, this."

Publication:
Mikolajczyk R, Horn J, Schmedt N, Langner I, Lindemann C, Garbe E. Accident prevention by medication among children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - A case-only study. JAMA Pediatrics. 2015; http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.3275

Contact:
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS
Department of Clinical Epidemiology
Prof. Dr. Edeltraut Garbe
Phone +49/(0)421/218-56862
Email garbe@bips.uni-bremen.de

Niklas Schmedt
Phone +49/(0)421/218-56868
Email schmedt@bips.uni-bremen.de

Press office BIPS
Anja Wirsing
Phone +49/(0)421/218-56780
Email presse@bips.uni-bremen.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.3275

Anja Wirsing | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
https://www.bips-institut.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Biofuel produced by microalgae
28.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies

28.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>