Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cedars-Sinai, global consortium develop stem cell tool to test Huntington’s treatments

06.07.2012
From skin cells to brain cells, new “disease in a dish” model offers step forward in understanding fatal inherited disorder and ways to test therapies for it

Cedars-Sinai scientists, in collaboration with expert colleagues around the globe, used stem cells to re-create Huntington’s Disease in a petri dish, allowing researchers for the first time to test potential treatments for the fatal inherited neurological disorder directly on human cells.

As outlined in a paper published online by Cell Stem Cell and slated for print in the journal’s Aug. 3 issue, scientists at Cedars-Sinai’s Regenerative Medicine Institute and the University of Wisconsin took skin cells from patients with Huntington’s disease and reprogrammed them into powerful stem cells; these were then made into the nervous system cells affected by the disease. Seven laboratories around the world collaborated to demonstrate the cells had hallmarks of Huntington’s.

“Now that we’ve moved from skin cells to brain cells, the next step forward will be to test treatments we can move from the petri dish to the clinic,” said Clive Svendsen, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute and a senior author of the study. “In addition to increasing our understanding of this disorder and offering a new pathway to identifying treatments, this study is remarkable because of the extensive interactions between a large group of scientists focused on developing this model. It’s a new way of doing trailblazing science.”

This breakthrough is the latest example of an innovative use for stem cells, reprogramming them to create laboratory versions of diseases. This method has been used to mimic Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and spinal muscular atrophy. As these diseases all occur in living neurons – that patients can’t part with – the disease-in-a-dish models offer scientists an opportunity they never had before: to study in human cells how a disease attacks the neurons and plot strategies for fighting it.

The Huntington’s Disease iPSC Consortium united some of the world’s top scientists working on this disease. Cedars-Sinai researchers took skin cells from a several Huntington’s patients, including a six-year-old with a severe juvenile form of the disease. They genetically reprogrammed these tissues into induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be made into any type of cell in the body. The cells lines were banked by scientists at Cedars-Sinai and scrutinized by all consortium members for differences that may have led to the disease. These cell lines are now an important resource for Huntington’s researchers and have been made available via a National Institutes of Health-funded repository at Coriell Institute for Medical Research in New Jersey.

Huntington’s, known to the public, for example, as the cause of folksinger Woody Guthrie’s death, typically strikes patients in midlife. It causes jerky, twitching motions, loss of muscle control, psychiatric disorders and dementia; the disease ultimately is fatal. In rare, severe cases, the disorder appears in childhood.

Researchers believe that Huntington’s results from a mutation in the huntintin gene, leading to production of an abnormal protein and ultimately cell death in specific areas of the brain that control movement and cognition. There is no cure for Huntington’s, nor therapies to slow its progression.

The consortium showed Huntington’s cell deficits or how they differ from normal cells, including that they were less likely to survive cultivation in the petri dish. Scientists tried depriving them of a growth factor present around normal cells, or “stressing” them, and found that Huntington’s neurons died even faster. The trick with disease-in-a-dish models is verifying that the cells are, in fact, behaving in the same manner they would in a patient, said Virginia Mattis, a post-doctoral scientist at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute and one of the lead authors of the study.

“It was great that these characteristics were seen not only in our laboratory, but by all of the consortium members using different techniques,” Mattis said. “It was very reassuring and significantly strengthens the value of this study.”

This new model will provide the foundation for a new round of experiments by the consortium funded by a new grant from the NIH and the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

The Cedars-Sinai’s Regenerative Medicine Institute has made a major commitment to projects like this Huntington’s study in which stem cell research helps to advance understanding of human disease and open new and innovative methods to identify treatments and cures. The institute has developed an induced pluripotent stem cell core facility and recruited faculty to work in this emerging area of regenerative medicine research.

“At last, we have a human cell model for this tragic disease that will be a powerful new tool in identifying treatments for these patients,” said Shlomo Melmed, MD, dean of the medical faculty at Cedars-Sinai and the Helena A. and Philip E. Hixon Chair in Investigative Medicine. “This development is a compelling example of how important iPS cells are to furthering our understanding and finding cures for diseases that are currently untreatable.”

The consortium includes: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore; University of California, Irvine; University of Wisconsin School of Medicine; Massachusetts General Hospital; Harvard Medical School; University of California, San Francisco; Cardiff University; Universita degli Studi di Milano; and the CHDI Foundation.

Funding for the research came from an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant from the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS Recovery Act grant number: RC2-NS069422 ), a grant from the CHDI Foundation, Inc. and CIRM.

Nicole White | Cedars-Sinai News
Further information:
http://www.cshs.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

German Federal Government Promotes Health Care Research

29.03.2017 | Awards Funding

Periodic ventilation keeps more pollen out than tilted-open windows

29.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystems

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>