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Biotage Introduces Highly-Selective ExploraSep 96-Well Screening Plates based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

15.07.2010
Biotage (STO: BIOT), a leading supplier of tools and technology for analytical and medicinal chemistry, announced the introduction of ExploraSep 96-well screening plates to identify optimum scavengers.

The 4 different screening plates deliver 128 selective resins based on high-performance, Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs). Biotage provides professional MIPs technical consultation, information on additional formats as well as assistance with data interpretation and process development.

ExploraSep screening plates support rapid method development, reduced cycle times and allow the identification of selective molecular imprinted polymers for impurities such as genotoxins; currently a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Candidate MIPs identified during screening can be ordered separately for confirmation studies and then transferred to preparative or process scale applications.

ExploraSep screening plates contain a unique collection of proprietary separation phases based on MIPs and their non-imprinted homologs. The polymers are grouped so that each plate is themed and will target a particular class of impurities. Plate A can be used for screening polar, basic (e.g. amines), neutral (e.g. amides, or esters), and acidic (carboxylic acid) compounds. Plate U targets screening phosphates, phosphonates, sulphates and sulphonates, peptides, proteins as well as anions of carboxylic acids and more weakly binding lactones and neutral phosphates. Plate C can be used for screening 1,2- and 1,3-diols, a-hydroxycarboxylic acids, carbohydrates and hydrophillic peptides under basic conditions. Plate H polymers target non-polar and aromatic compounds.

Like a lock and key, molecularly imprinted polymers bind impurities, not just by chemical means, but also by spatial recognition. This dual-mechanism enables MIPs to be highly selective, working effectively at very low concentrations, getting down to very low impurity levels. In increasingly challenging regulatory climates, MIPs show excellent promise for being able to keep up with ever-tightening regulations. ExploraSep is ideal for researchers working with proprietary compounds, or with highly regulated compounds in many industries such as waste, environmental, chemical, consumer products, pharmaceutical process and more.

Biotage’s process-consumables and scavenging products are supported by a wealth of knowledge and experience in method development and support. “Biotage experts help to guide customers in choosing the right product and most efficient method that best suits their work-flow and development needs”, says Scott Carr, VP of Commercial Operations. “We bring exceptional support to our customers. This new generation of scavenging media raises the bar in terms of product performance and also reflects Biotage’s expertise and continued commitment to the industry.”

For further information please call Biotage or visit www.biotage.com: in Europe +46 18 56 57 10, in North America toll free 1 800 446 4752, in Japan +81 422 28 1233, other areas please call +46 18 56 57 10.

About Biotage
Biotage offers solutions, knowledge and experience in the areas of analytical and medicinal chemistry. The customers include the world’s top pharma and biotech companies, as well as leading academic institutes. The company is headquartered in Uppsala, Sweden, and has offices in the United States, United Kingdom and Japan. Biotage has 245 employees and had sales of SEK 394,1m in 2009. Biotage is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Nordic Stock Exchange.
For further product information contact:
Sunil Rana Ph.D., MRSC
Product Manager, Flash Consumables, Resins and IST Work-Up Products
IST House, Cardiff CF82 7TS
UK
Tel: +44 1443 864454
e-mail: sunil.rana@biotage.com.
For press information contact:
Rob Thompson
Director of Marketing Communications
10430 Harris Oaks Blvd. Suite C
Charlotte, North Carolina
USA
Tel: +1 704 654 4847
Fax: +1 704 654 4917
e-mail: rob.thompson@biotage.com

Rob Thompson | b3c newswire
Further information:
http://www.biotage.com

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