Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Autoantibodies Damage Blood Vessels in the Brain - Important Factor in the Development of Dementia

31.07.2012
The presence of specific autoantibodies of the immune system is associated with blood vessel damage in the brain.

These findings were made by Marion Bimmler, a graduate engineer of medical laboratory diagnostics at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch and Dr. Peter Karczewski of the biotech company E.R.D.E.-AAK-Diagnostik GmbH in studies on a rat model.


Antibodies damage blood vessels in the brain of rats (see arrow in image B). Eight months after the rats were administered an antibody against a surface protein (alpha1-adrenergic receptor) in the vascular cells, the blood vessels are hardly recognizable, because the blood flow has been interrupted. Image A shows the blood vessels (white) in the brain of healthy animals with no antibodies. These findings are important for understanding the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

(MR Angiography/Copyright: MDC)

The researchers’ results suggest that autoimmune mechanisms play a significant role in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia (PloS ONE, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041602)*.

Antibodies are the defense molecules of the body’s immune system against foreign invaders. If the antibodies cease to distinguish between “foreign” and “self”, they attack the cells of the own body, and are thus referred to as autoantibodies. These can trigger autoimmune diseases. Using MR angiography and other methods, Marion Bimmler and her colleagues have now shown that the autoantibodies bind to specific surface proteins (alpha1 andrenergic receptors) of vascular cells and thereby damage the blood vessels of the brain. The reason: The autoantibodies generate a continual stimulation of the receptor and at the same time trigger an increase in intracellular calcium ion levels. As a result, the blood vessel walls thicken, and blood flow to the brain is disturbed.
First encouraging results after removal of autoantibodies by immunoadsorption
In earlier studies, Marion Bimmler and her research team examined blood samples of patients with Alzheimer‘s or vascular dementia and showed that half of them had comparable autoantibodies. A first clinical trial together with Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin is currently ongoing with a collective of patients with Alzheimer’s or vascular dementia. The patients were divided into two groups – a small group whose autoantibodies were removed from the blood via immunoadsorption and a control group that did not receive this treatment. Until now, over an observation period of 6 and subsequently 12 months, the patient group who had undergone immunoadsorption improved in their memory performance and in their ability to cope with their everyday lives. In contrast, the condition of the patients who did not receive immunoadsorption treatment and continued to have autoantibodies in their blood deteriorated dramatically. Now the researchers are planning further clinical trials with larger numbers of patients.
*Antibodies to the alpha1-Adrenergic Receptor Cause Vascular Impairments in Rat Brain as Demonstrated by Magnetic Resonance Angiography

Peter Karczewski, E.R.D.E.-AAK-Diagnostik GmbH, Berlin, Germany
Andreas Pohlmann, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
Babette Wagenhaus, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
Natali Wisbrun, Animal Facilities, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
Petra Hempel, E.R.D.E.-AAK-Diagnostik GmbH, Berlin, Germany
Bernd Lemke, IT Department, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
Rudolf Kunze, E.R.D.E. e.V., Berlin, Germany
Thoralf Niendorf, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
Marion Bimmler, Autoimmunity and G Protein-Coupled Receptors, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany

Contact:
Barbara Bachtler
Press Department
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch
in the Helmholtz Association
Robert-Rössle-Straße 10; 13125 Berlin, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 30 94 06 - 38 96; Fax: +49 (0) 30 94 06 - 38 33
e-mail: presse@mdc-berlin.de

Barbara Bachtler | Max-Delbrück-Centrum
Further information:
http://www.mdc-berlin.de/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>