Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Applying the FDA Definition of Whole Grains Limits the Support for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Health Claims

11.12.2008
LSRO finds insufficient evidence to support a cardiovascular disease or diabetes health claim when considering only studies that conform to the FDA definition of whole grains.

In 2005, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes were the first and seventh leading causes of death in the U.S., responsible for over 650,000 and 75,000 deaths, respectively.

The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans states that “consuming at least 3 ounce-equivalents of whole grains per day can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, may help with weight maintenance, and may lower risk for other chronic diseases”. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has allowed food manufacturers to make health claims linking whole grains consumption to CVD risk reduction since 1999. However, it was not until 2006 that the FDA defined whole grains in its guidance to the industry and to assist manufacturers in labeling their products. In this guidance document, FDA defined whole grains as the intact, ground, cracked or flaked fruit of the grains whose principal components—the starchy endosperm, germ and bran—are present in the same relative proportions as they exist in the intact grain.

New Report Issued by LSRO

The Kellogg Company requested that the Life Science Research Office, Inc. (LSRO), www.lsro.org, conduct a third-party, independent evaluation of the effect of strict application of the FDA definition of whole grains on the scientific basis for whole grains health claims. LSRO convened a panel of independent scientists to comprehensively review the relevant scientific literature about whole grains consumption and risks of CVD and diabetes. The Expert Panel’s findings and conclusions are presented in the latest LSRO report entitled, Whole Grain Intake and Cardiovascular Disease and Whole Grain Intake and Diabetes: A Review. The findings and conclusions detailed in the report represent the views of LSRO alone.

Key Findings and Conclusions

Using the FDA definition for whole grains as a selection criterion to evaluate the scientific literature is limiting because most of the studies use a broader concept of whole grains.

The few studies that meet the FDA whole grains definition provide insufficient scientific evidence to support a CVD health claim.

A whole grains and CVD health claim is supported when a larger number of studies that use a broader concept of whole grain that includes isolated bran, germ or fiber in their analysis of whole grains are also considered.

The scientific evidence on risk reduction of diabetes and whole grain consumption is suggestive, but not conclusive, whether or not the study meets the FDA definition of whole grains.

This type of analysis is complicated by the diversity in nutrients and bioactive components of different types of whole grains.

For nearly half a century, the Life Sciences Research Office (LSRO) has provided expert, objective scientific opinions and evaluations to governmental agencies and leading corporations in the food, health and bioscience sectors. A non-profit organization originally established in 1962, LSRO provides independent science-based analysis and advice that has proven integral to the development of sound policies and regulations on the national and international level.

This study will be of interest to academic, government, and industry researchers, public health organizations; public health organizations and their staff. The report will also be of interest to the general public.

A copy of the report is available to the media. A free copy of the executive summary is available online at www.LSRO.org. Purchase this report at www.LSRO.org/bookstore.

Michael Falk | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.LSRO.org

Further reports about: CVD Cardiovascular Diabetes FDA Grain LSRO Whole Grains chronic disease claim public health

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
23.02.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht New Mechanisms of Gene Inactivation may prevent Aging and Cancer
23.02.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Alternsforschung - Fritz-Lipmann-Institut e.V. (FLI)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>