Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A new era for EU systems biology

26.05.2010
Sixteen research projects worth EUR 24 million have been launched to address some of the biggest challenges facing us today, such as food security and human disease. Part of the EU's ERA-NET (European Research Area - Network) scheme, all of these projects use systems biology, a rapidly growing scientific field that is expected to contribute greatly to Europe's industrial competitiveness in the future.

Systems biology is based on the computer modelling of biological systems, ranging from single cells up to complete organisms. As an emerging interdisciplinary science, it combines methods from molecular biology, engineering sciences, mathematics, information technology, and systems sciences. As well as obvious medical applications, systems biology has the potential to have a significant impact on agriculture and biotechnology.

'Systems biology is a fantastically powerful approach and very versatile - as demonstrated by the range of projects funded through ERASYSBIO+,' said Professor Douglas Kell, Chief Executive of the UK's Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and member of the ERASYSBIO+ ('The consolidation of systems biology research - stimulating the widespread adoption of systems approaches in biomedicine, biotechnology, and agri-food') consortium.

A total of 85 research groups from 14 different countries are involved in the projects, which include C5SYS ('Circadian and cell cycle clock systems in cancer'), SHIPREC ('Living with uninvited guests comparing plant and animal responses to endocytic invasions'), FRIM ('Fruit integrative modelling'), and GRAPPLE ('Iterative modelling of gene regulatory interactions underlying stress, disease and ageing in C. elegans').

'These projects not only bring together disciplines, but also countries, and this is the sort of collaborative working that is becoming increasingly important. If we are to make the best use of our bioscience knowledge, expertise and facilities in the UK then we absolutely must share them with colleagues outside the UK and in other fields such as mathematics, computing, chemistry and physics,' added Professor Kell.

The original ERASYSBIO ('Towards a European Research Area for systems biology - a transnational funding initiative to support the convergence of life sciences with information technology and systems sciences') ERA-NET ran from 2006 to 2009. It represented the first intense collaboration between the systems biology community and major funding agencies in several European countries. The initiative was an opportunity for agencies to coordinate their national research programmes in systems biology and to agree on a common agenda with joint activities.

Its successor, ERASYSBIO+, is an ERA-NET Plus action which provides additional EU financial support to facilitate joint calls for proposals between national and/or regional programmes (compared to an ERA-NET action, which provides the framework for bringing together stakeholders).

The focus of the ERASYSBIO+ consortium for the next five years will be to implement transnational funding activities for systems biology, such as the 16 recently-launched projects. A total of EUR 18.5 million in support of the research was provided by the partner countries themselves, while the EU contributed a further EUR 5.5 million.

ERASYSBIO+ is made up of 16 ministries and funding agencies from 13 countries. Partners of national programmes include representatives from Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and the UK. The objective of the ERA-NET scheme is to build the European Research Area by developing and strengthening the coordination of national and regional research programmes.

For more information, please visit:

ERASYSBIO:
http://www.erasysbio.net/
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC):
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/
Category: Projects
Information Source: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; ERASYSBIO+

Document Reference: Based on information from BBSRC and ERASYSBIO+

| CORDIS
Further information:
http://www.erasysbio.net/
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/
http://cordis.europa.eu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Periodic ventilation keeps more pollen out than tilted-open windows

29.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystems

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

OLED production facility from a single source

29.03.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>