Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A new era for EU systems biology

26.05.2010
Sixteen research projects worth EUR 24 million have been launched to address some of the biggest challenges facing us today, such as food security and human disease. Part of the EU's ERA-NET (European Research Area - Network) scheme, all of these projects use systems biology, a rapidly growing scientific field that is expected to contribute greatly to Europe's industrial competitiveness in the future.

Systems biology is based on the computer modelling of biological systems, ranging from single cells up to complete organisms. As an emerging interdisciplinary science, it combines methods from molecular biology, engineering sciences, mathematics, information technology, and systems sciences. As well as obvious medical applications, systems biology has the potential to have a significant impact on agriculture and biotechnology.

'Systems biology is a fantastically powerful approach and very versatile - as demonstrated by the range of projects funded through ERASYSBIO+,' said Professor Douglas Kell, Chief Executive of the UK's Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and member of the ERASYSBIO+ ('The consolidation of systems biology research - stimulating the widespread adoption of systems approaches in biomedicine, biotechnology, and agri-food') consortium.

A total of 85 research groups from 14 different countries are involved in the projects, which include C5SYS ('Circadian and cell cycle clock systems in cancer'), SHIPREC ('Living with uninvited guests comparing plant and animal responses to endocytic invasions'), FRIM ('Fruit integrative modelling'), and GRAPPLE ('Iterative modelling of gene regulatory interactions underlying stress, disease and ageing in C. elegans').

'These projects not only bring together disciplines, but also countries, and this is the sort of collaborative working that is becoming increasingly important. If we are to make the best use of our bioscience knowledge, expertise and facilities in the UK then we absolutely must share them with colleagues outside the UK and in other fields such as mathematics, computing, chemistry and physics,' added Professor Kell.

The original ERASYSBIO ('Towards a European Research Area for systems biology - a transnational funding initiative to support the convergence of life sciences with information technology and systems sciences') ERA-NET ran from 2006 to 2009. It represented the first intense collaboration between the systems biology community and major funding agencies in several European countries. The initiative was an opportunity for agencies to coordinate their national research programmes in systems biology and to agree on a common agenda with joint activities.

Its successor, ERASYSBIO+, is an ERA-NET Plus action which provides additional EU financial support to facilitate joint calls for proposals between national and/or regional programmes (compared to an ERA-NET action, which provides the framework for bringing together stakeholders).

The focus of the ERASYSBIO+ consortium for the next five years will be to implement transnational funding activities for systems biology, such as the 16 recently-launched projects. A total of EUR 18.5 million in support of the research was provided by the partner countries themselves, while the EU contributed a further EUR 5.5 million.

ERASYSBIO+ is made up of 16 ministries and funding agencies from 13 countries. Partners of national programmes include representatives from Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and the UK. The objective of the ERA-NET scheme is to build the European Research Area by developing and strengthening the coordination of national and regional research programmes.

For more information, please visit:

ERASYSBIO:
http://www.erasysbio.net/
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC):
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/
Category: Projects
Information Source: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; ERASYSBIO+

Document Reference: Based on information from BBSRC and ERASYSBIO+

| CORDIS
Further information:
http://www.erasysbio.net/
http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/
http://cordis.europa.eu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>