Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers send in thousands of new ideas for European research

12.06.2002


Universities, companies and research centres have sent more than 15,000 ideas for European research projects to the European Commission. More than 100,000 groups and institutions were involved in drafting the ideas; the proposed teams involve potentially several hundreds of thousands of researchers across Europe and beyond. In a radical departure from previous programmes and for the first time, on March 20, 2002, the Commission asked the scientific community to say what they see as the most promising topics for cutting edge research in the 6th Research Framework Programme, due to be launched in autumn this year. Research Commissioner Philippe Busquin is encouraged by the massive response. "It shows that the European Research Area is becoming a reality", he said. "The strong response also demonstrates that our researchers have many good ideas. That much more funding for research is needed in Europe through a co-ordinated investment by Member States. It is an encouraging sign as we work towards the EU’s target of investing 3% of GDP in research by 2010. Our researchers want to work together and share efforts with the best of their field in other countries. They want to work together in a new way at the European level, namely in projects or networks with sufficient critical mass to meet global scientific or technological challenges."

Encouraging closer links between researchers all over the EU is a key priority for the European Commission. EU action to pool resources, to bring together research teams in different countries and to share expertise is essential if the EU is to compete both scientifically and economically in the global marketplace. Without EU action, compartmentalisation of EU member state’s research efforts, duplication of research efforts and failure to share expertise would continue to undermine EU competitiveness.

The European Parliament and the European Council decided earlier this month on the main orientations of the 6th Framework Programme, which will have a 4-year budget of EUR 17,5 billion. The Commission invited companies, universities and research centres to express their interest for research projects or networks in the fields of genomics and life sciences, information technologies, nanotechnologies, aerospace, food safety, sustainable development and social sciences. Submissions are split roughly equally between integrated projects and networks of excellence, the new modes of working in the European research programmes.

In an effort to promote partnering and collaboration, the Commission will publish all expressions of interest over the summer on a dedicated web site. An analysis of the ideas received will be made public in September 2002 and will feed into the drafting of the detailed work programmes, which form the basis for the calls for proposals to be published at the end of this year.

Background

The Sixth EU Framework Programme for Research and Development will run from 2002 to 2006. It is designed as an instrument to help realise a European Research Area, an objective initially set by the European Commission and endorsed by the Heads of state and government at their spring summits. The new Framework Programme is based on 4 main principles: promoting scientific excellence, concentrating on a limited number of priorities with a true European added value, structuring and integrating European and national efforts, and simplifying procedures.

Fabio FABBI: 02 2964174
Lone MIKKELSEN : 02 2960567

Fabio Fabbi | EU Commission
Further information:
http://www.cordis.lu/fp6/eoi-instruments/

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht Bergamotene - alluring and lethal for Manduca sexta
21.04.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie

nachricht How to color a lizard: From biology to mathematics
13.04.2017 | Université de Genève

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>