Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Implants: A Better Fit Through Mathematics

30.04.2012
Individuals with implants may soon be able to feel the benefit of basic scientific knowledge in their own bodies.

This is one of the findings of a translational research project conducted by the Austrian Science Fund FWF. The project demonstrated how 3D models and special mathematical methods could be used to improve the design and integration of implants in the body on a patient-specific basis.

Data was gathered from computer and magnetic resonance tomography and used to generate 3D models specifically for shoulder joints and their replacements. The data was analysed in a procedure known as the finite element method, and possible individual optimisations were calculated. The project exemplifies the acute benefit of research findings from the Translational Research Programme, which ended at the close of the first quarter of 2012.

Basic research forms the foundation for future applications, as illustrated by programmes like the Translational Research Programme. This programme, which the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) conducted on behalf of the country´s Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (BMVIT), ran until early 2012 and served to accelerate the transfer of basic knowledge into practical applications: Applications which, first and foremost, improve the quality of people´s lives, in addition to creating economic value. Take project L526, for example.

SHOULDER TO SHOULDER: MATHEMATICS & MEDICINE This project brought together basic scientific knowledge from the areas of mathematics, medicine and computer science with the aim of optimising replacement shoulder joints individually (patient-specific). Headed by Dr. Karl Entacher from Salzburg University of Applied Sciences and Dr. Peter Schuller-Götzburg from the Paracelsus Medical University in Salzburg, the project initially computed human shoulder joint models and then used them as the basis for the analytical simulation of varying load conditions.

The team commenced by using imaging techniques to create the computer models. To this effect, computer tomography was used to build up images of human shoulder joints on a layer-by-layer basis. As Dr. Entacher explains: "Modern tomography techniques allow us to create images of an entire shoulder joint layer-by-layer, and the layer thicknesses that we can achieve today make excellent resolution possible. We were able to use this image data to create computer-generated 3D models of each patient´s individual shoulder joint, forming the basis for our subsequent analysis."

FINITE FINDINGS
This subsequent analysis was based on a mathematical process called the finite element (FE) method. With this method, the objects to be analysed are depicted in small - but finite - elements. Their behaviour can then be computed numerically and simulated, taking into account variables such as material properties and load, as well as the limits of movement. In the process, it is possible to model the most varied conditions that the joint might face. Speaking about these conditions, Dr. Entacher comments: "Our aim was to simulate the implant at different positions and different angles in the body, as well as to simulate the anatomical make-up of different, individual patients." In fact, the model was so sophisticated that different types of tissue, such as soft tissue or different bone sections, could be selected. It was also possible to create virtual sections to move different parts of the bone or the implant to any given position. All in all, this enabled the scientists to gather valuable data for the patient-specific optimisation of shoulder and even tooth implants. This could provide future patients with important information on the positioning, the type or the performance of their implant before they have an operation.

Commenting on the personal significance of the project and the end of the Translational Research Programme, Dr. Entacher says: "As a basic researcher, it is very satisfying to see how working with physicians and engineers can turn our findings into specific applications that can help people. In fact, I feel it provides a more personal perspective on personal development. In addition to this personal experience, the Translational Research Programme also makes a significant contribution to innovation culture in Austria. A contribution that will be missing in the future."

Image and text available from Monday, April 30 2012, 09.00 CET at:
http://www.fwf.ac.at/en/public_relations/press/pv201204-en.html
Scientific Contact:
Dr. Karl Entacher
Salzburg University of Applied Sciences
Information Technology & System Management
5412 Salzburg, Austria
E karl.entacher@fh-salzburg.ac.at
M +43 / (0)664 / 750-39319
Austrian Science Fund FWF:
Mag. Stefan Bernhardt
Haus der Forschung
Sensengasse 1
1090 Vienna, Austria
T +43 / (0)1 / 505 67 40 - 8111
E stefan.bernhardt@fwf.ac.at
W http://www.fwf.ac.at
Copy Editing & Distribution:
PR&D - Public Relations for Research & Education Mariannengasse 8
1090 Vienna, Austria
T +43 / (0)1 / 505 70 44
E contact@prd.at
W http://www.prd.at

Margot Pechtigam | PR&D
Further information:
http://www.fwf.ac.at

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance
27.02.2017 | DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

nachricht 36 big data research projects
21.02.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>