Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Research Offers Security For Virtualization, Cloud Computing

28.04.2010
Virtualization and cloud computing allow computer users access to powerful computers and software applications hosted by remote groups of servers, but security concerns related to data privacy are limiting public confidence – and slowing adoption of the new technology.

Now researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new techniques and software that may be the key to resolving those security concerns and boosting confidence in the sector.

“What we’ve done represents a significant advance in security for cloud computing and other virtualization applications,” says Dr. Xuxian Jiang, an assistant professor of computer science and co-author of the study. “Anyone interested in the virtualization sector will be very interested in our work.”

Virtualization allows the pooling of the computational power and storage of multiple computers, which can then be shared by multiple users. For example, under the cloud computing paradigm, businesses can lease computer resources from a data center to operate Web sites and interact with customers – without having to pay for the overhead of buying and maintaining their own IT infrastructures. The virtualization manager, commonly referred to as a “hypervisor,” is a type of software that creates “virtual machines” that operate in isolation from one another on a common computer. In other words, the hypervisor allows different operating systems to run in isolation from one another – even though each of these systems is using computing power and storage capability on the same computer. This is the technique that enables concepts like cloud computing to function.

One of the major threats to virtualization – and cloud computing – is malicious software that enables computer viruses or other malware that have compromised one customer’s system to spread to the underlying hypervisor and, ultimately, to the systems of other customers. In short, a key concern is that one cloud computing customer could download a virus – such as one that steals user data – and then spread that virus to the systems of all the other customers.

“If this sort of attack is feasible, it undermines consumer confidence in cloud computing,” Jiang says, “since consumers couldn’t trust that their information would remain confidential.”

But Jiang and his Ph.D. student Zhi Wang have now developed software, called HyperSafe, that leverages existing hardware features to secure hypervisors against such attacks. “We can guarantee the integrity of the underlying hypervisor by protecting it from being compromised by any malware downloaded by an individual user,” Jiang says. “By doing so, we can ensure the hypervisor’s isolation.”

For malware to affect a hypervisor, it typically needs to run its own code in the hypervisor. HyperSafe utilizes two components to prevent that from happening. First, the HyperSafe program “has a technique called non-bypassable memory lockdown, which explicitly and reliably bars the introduction of new code by anyone other than the hypervisor administrator,” Jiang says. “This also prevents attempts to modify existing hypervisor code by external users.”

Second, HyperSafe uses a technique called restricted pointer indexing. This technique “initially characterizes a hypervisor’s normal behavior, and then prevents any deviation from that profile,” Jiang says. “Only the hypervisor administrators themselves can introduce changes to the hypervisor code.”

The research was funded by the U.S. Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation. The research, “HyperSafe: A Lightweight Approach to Provide Lifetime Hypervisor Control-Flow Integrity,” will be presented May 18 at the 31st IEEE Symposium On Security And Privacy in Oakland, Calif.

NC State’s Department of Computer Science is part of the university’s College of Engineering.

Matt Shipman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ncsu.edu

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified
05.12.2016 | University of Sussex

nachricht UT professor develops algorithm to improve online mapping of disaster areas
29.11.2016 | University of Tennessee at Knoxville

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

09.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Scientists produce a new roadmap for guiding development & conservation in the Amazon

09.12.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops' exposure to air pollution

09.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>