Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Inventors of Plastic Shield To Stop Cash Machine Skimming Fear Arrest

27.09.2005


Two design engineers at the University of Warwick have devised a simple 250 pounds plastic shield that could play a significant role in eliminating the card skimming cash machine fraud that costs banks tens of millions of pound. However, now the researchers fear arrest if they are to try and take their device forward.



Falling technology cost and increasing technical sophistication of fraudsters have led to a boom in the criminal use of hidden cameras and card "skimming" devices being secreted on ATMs (cash machines) allowing fraudsters to obtain the electronic details and matching numbers of cash cards. Tens of millions of pounds are lost each year from the UK’s network of 57,000 cash machines to this type of fraud. The banks have responded with a number of hi tech solutions to the problem using expensive convoluted solutions to try and disrupt the illegal cameras and skimmers but this simple University of Warwick design provides a much simpler cheaper and effective solution to the problem.

The two design engineers Kevin Pearson and Mark Rushton for the University of Warwick’s Warwick Manufacturing Group, have devised a transparent plastic shield that can be securely retrofitted to existing ATMs or built-in to the design of future ATMs. Any attempt to attach a non transparent device such as a camera or skimmer on top of the shield then becomes impossible without being obvious to ATM users. It is also impossible to place a second fake shield on top of the first as the shield is positioned at a distance from the ATM card slot that just before the limit that the slot will accept and draw in the card. If the distance to the slot was increased any further the slot will not be able to draw in the card.


The Warwick design team have patented their design. They have also won 10,000 pounds worth of development funding from the "Mercia Spinner" (an initiative run by the University of Warwick’s Warwick ventures department and funded by Advantage West Midlands designed to create technology based "spin out" companies.

This has allowed them to produce some small scale models of the shield but they now face a problem. They would like to produce a full scale model of the shield made exactly to the measurements of the most ATMs for further testing but they can’t get the exact dimensions of an ATM without going up to an actual machine and measuring it up - which will naturally draw suspicion that they themselves are engaged in some sort of fraudulent enterprise. Hopefully one of the banks or ATM manufacturers will see the potential of working with them to help devise a full prototype before the designers have to risk arrest?

Peter Dunn | alfa
Further information:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/NE100000012380/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
21.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Sensors embedded in sports equipment could provide real-time analytics to your smartphone
16.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>