Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

CERN openlab adds a new dimension to Grid computing

06.07.2004


The CERN openlab for DataGrid applications, a partnership between CERN , the European Organization for Nuclear Research, and five leading IT companies – Enterasys Networks, HP, IBM, Intel and Oracle – has announced a series of server and storage technical results regarding the first global science Grid – the Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid project, LCG. The announcement was made at the recent annual sponsors meeting of the CERN openlab.

The openlab partners have demonstrated that a cluster of 40 HP servers running 64-bit Intel® Itanium® 2 processors can be successfully integrated with the LCG, which involves over 60 major scientific computing centres in Europe, North America and Asia. The openlab partners have also completed intensive testing of IBM’s SAN File System to demonstrate scale-out capabilities of the new storage software.

With this landmark addition of servers, the openlab partners have proven that the LCG, otherwise based on 32-bit processors, can be extended to a truly heterogeneous computing environment. This is crucial for the future evolution of this Grid, as it must grow rapidly in capacity and power to prepare for the tremendous data storage and analysis requirements of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. The LHC is expected to produce some 15 petabytes of data per year after it is switched on in 2007. Thousands of physicists will sift through this data for years to come, analysing it for tell-tale signs of new fundamental particles that will provide insights into the early origins of our Universe.



The CERN openlab, a three-year industrial cooperation formally launched in January 2003, marked its halfway mark at the annual sponsors meeting on June 22nd, and has already tallied a number of impressive technical results. Together, the partners have built the CERN opencluster, a state-of-the-art system for testing prototype Grid applications of increasing power and functionality. The open, collaborative environment of the partnership places an emphasis on a common development programme for data-intensive Grid computing based on open standards. This includes a 28 terabyte high-end storage system and advanced storage management software, supplied by IBM, state-of-the-art switching and routing equipment from Enterasys Networks, and the advanced, grid-enabled Oracle® Database 10g.

CERN’s Director General, Dr. Robert Aymar, described the contribution of the CERN openlab as being of crucial importance to the LHC project. Looking ahead, he noted that “The CERN openlab provides a role model for how CERN and its academic partners may in future wish to organise collaboration between the private and public sector, in order to develop the many new technologies that will surely be needed for endeavours beyond the LHC. As the results so far show, CERN openlab has effectively established a framework for collaboration between multiple industrial partners, in a pre-competitive spirit and based on open standards.”

Other key results obtained with the CERN opencluster include a data challenge where storage-to-tape rates of over 1GB/s were maintained for hours, corresponding to the maximum rates at which data from the LHC will need to be stored to a primary tape backup. The high-speed switching environment sponsored by Enterasys Networks played a crucial role in that result. Also, some of the HP server nodes with Intel Itanium® 2 dual processors contributed to the Internet-2 landspeed record that was set last October by CERN and partner Caltech, during Telecom 2, which demonstrated the rate – more than 1 terabyte in 30 minutes – at which data from the LHC will need to be distributed to the LCG’s so-called Tier-1 centres around the globe, for local storage and analysis.

Additionally, the researchers completed breakthrough testing on IBM’s Storage Tank™ storage management technology, which is used in IBM’s latest storage software product the IBM TotalStorage® SAN File System. The software is designed without inherent limitations on the amount of storage that can be supported. The project recently managed more than 100 simultaneous SAN File System clients and over 28 terabytes of storage distributed among 10 storage servers. These tests measured data rates exceeding the initial expectations from CERN.

Recently, Oracle-sponsored researchers in the CERN openlab managed to increase the availability of CERN’s grid computing environment by significantly reducing downtime of its catalogue, whose job is to ensure correct mapping of filenames and file IDs and identified a way to upgrade an Oracle database from one release to another whilst keeping the database operational. Both results represent new ways to use existing technology to address the challenges of grid-based computing.

Francois Grey | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cern.ch

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Smarter robot vacuum cleaners for automated office cleaning
15.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Researchers 3-D print first truly microfluidic 'lab on a chipl devices
15.08.2017 | Brigham Young University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Climate change: In their old age, trees still accumulate large quantities of carbon

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences

Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related

17.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Superconductivity research reveals potential new state of matter

17.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>