Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bison reintroduction to Central Russia

17.05.2004


Russian scientists are investigating the opportunity to bring wisents (Bison bonasus) back to the forests of Central Russia. Their effort has been funded by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research and the Federal Target Scientific and Technical Program called “Conservation of Rare Species”.



The story of rescuing wisents (Bison bonasus) which had been practically on the verge of extinction became classical and was included in schoolbooks. However, this does not mean that wisents are thriving. These animals’ position is still so unstable that they will perish without people’s constant care. In the meantime, the scientists are planning to bring wisents back to the forests of Central Russia. The specialists from the Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution Problems (Russian Academy of Sciences) believe that this is feasible, but requires a competent wisent reproduction policy.

An all-sufficient stable wisent population should have the quantity of at least 500 head. Specialists of the International wisent group recommend a larger population of at least 1,000 animals. In Russia, it is possible to create such a totality of herds living at large in the territory of the Kaluga and the Briansk Regions and in the North-West of the Orel Region. It is there, in the National Park called “Orel Marshy Woodlands” and in adjacent territories, the first phase of the project is implemented to establish a large stable wisent population in the central part of Russia. This program has been supported by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Global Ecological Fund, it is also sponsored by E.S. Stroyev, governor of the Orel Region.


So far, the park territory of 36 thousand hectares is inhabited by only 68 wisents, out of which only 26 animals breed actively. The wisents are divided into 4 isolated groups, containing from three to twenty head. Forecasting the fate of the future population, the specialists carried out field observations in the park, studied archival materials, and even applied computer simulation of demographic and genetic processes.

Wisents are polygamic animals. Females start to reproduce at the age of 4 and bring posterity within 12 to 14 years. Childbearing age of male is even less – from 5 through 12 years, although some males may become fathers at the age of 15. Researchers’ estimations have proved that the largest group of the Orel Region wisents has good chances to reproduce themselves up to 100 head in 12 to 15 years given the lack of natural calamities, general epidemics and poaching: should the 100 head quantity is reached, the wisents will not be threatened by extinction from casual fertility fluctuations. Along with that, the group will preserve initial genetic diversity and will be able to avoid degeneration. The rest of the groups will remain in the demographic and genetic instability zone for the next 20 years, unless urgent measures are undertaken. The scientists suggest that the quantity of each of these groups should be increased up to 20 to 25 animals at the expense of bringing in new wisents. The Orel Region population possesses a sufficient level of genetic diversity for further stable development. For successful inhabiting of the National Park, it is very important to preserve each group of the Orel population, to promote stable and quick reproduction of the animals and continuous exchange of animals between the groups. For the time being, such a small herd lives in isolation, but the researchers hope that when the animals get more numerous, the groups will start contacting. That is quite possible as there are no hindrances in the territories inhabited by the wisents. Along with that, keeping in mind the previous experience in establishing wisent populations at large and the territory conservatism inherent in the species, the researchers should not expect these animals to disperse by themselves in the forests of the Kaluga and Briansk Regions. Six to eight similar populations are to be established to ensure bringing wisents back to the forests of Central Russia.

Sergey Komarov | Informnauka
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru/eng/2004/2004-05-17-041_24_e.htm

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

nachricht A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index
21.08.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

New quantum phenomena in graphene superlattices

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A simple additive to improve film quality

19.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>