Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UCI study offers blueprint for pinpointing sources of beach water pollution

10.01.2003


Innovative tests trigger clean up efforts at popular California beach



A UC Irvine-led study has proved instrumental for significantly improving the quality of beach water at a popular California tourist destination. The same study also provides the blueprint for assisting similar beachside communities with an innovative approach for pinpointing the causes of water pollution.

The research was headed by UCI environmental engineer Stanley Grant and USC microbiologist Jed Fuhrman, working with Alexandria Boehm of Stanford University and Robert Mrše of UCI. Their results will be posted Jan. 9, 2003, on the Research ASAP site of Environmental Science & Technology.


The study reveals that it’s possible to identify and track the specific sources of water pollution by combining bacteria sampling with genetic testing. The research team used this technique while studying the causes of beach pollution in Avalon, Catalina Island—a popular tourist destination for swimming and recreational boating. By combining these methods, the researchers found that decaying sewage pipes in the downtown area adjacent to Avalon Bay had been leaking human waste into the shoreline water.

As a result of this research, Avalon officials sliplined the city’s sewer lines to seal the leaks and are currently investigating connecting pipes from private businesses and homes for further leakage. Their work has already decreased bacteria levels along the shoreline by more than 50 percent, and beach closures declined from 31 in 2001 to 15 in 2002.

This approach provides a new method for coastal agencies to comply with tougher beach water quality laws. Currently, beaches are tested for fecal indicator bacteria using methods that only provide general information on potential sources for pollution. High bacteria content can lead to beach closures.

"Right now, beach communities are faced with bacterial pollution without knowing their sources," said Grant, who has conducted numerous fecal indicator bacteria tests on Southern California beaches. "But the combination of indicator sampling and genetic testing has the potential to make a real difference in efforts to clean up polluted beaches."

Study funding came from the state’s Clean Beaches Initiative project, which provided for Proposition 13 grants to be made available to fund 38 projects. The initiative’s major goal is to reduce health risks and increase the public’s access to clean beaches.

Tom Vasich | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://today.uci.edu/news/release_detail.asp?key=962

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How fires are changing the tundra’s face
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boars
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>