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Underground Nuclear Explosions Deteriorate The Ozone Layer

16.08.2002


Russian scientists have found one more cause of depletion of the ozone layer. They think that abyssal gases can go to the surface and reach stratosphere, deteriorating the ozone shield. Underground nuclear explosions enforce this process. A geologist Boris Golubov of the Institute of Geosphere Dynamics RAS and a climatologist Grigoriy Kruchenitsky of Central Aerology Observatory are authors of this hypothesis.



Winter and spring are the most common seasons for ozone holes above Yakutia. The unique climatic conditions are favourable for a deep gas blast to reach stratosphere without drifting and dissipating. For example, a gas cloud 10 meters in diameter rises as a whole. Perhaps such clouds work as a lift for ozone-deteriorating compounds. It is known that the Earth crust is divided into blocks with fractures between them. Hydrogen, methane and radioactive gases can go through the fractures to the Earth surface. According to Vladimir Syvorotkin of Moscow State University, at certain climatic conditions the gases can rise vertically up and reach the ozone layer. This gaseous blowing of the atmosphere is most probable in the seismic areas with big active fractures. But Yakutia is one of the seismically calm places on the Earth. So why gases? May be they penetrating through diamond pipes, underground nuclear explosions enforcing the deep gas leakage.

It is no doubt that an underground nuclear explosion is not a single-time process. It causes prolonged instability in the crust changing geological parameters of the territory. Kruchenitsky and his colleagues of Russian Meteorology Service have charted out a map of ozone holes above the Russian territory for several years. Golubov has combined the map with a pattern of underground nuclear explosions. They found that ozone holes are strictly above the places of the explosions.


In 1995 and 1997 climatologists observed especially large ozone holes above Eastern Siberia. Strictly under the holes there are two diamond deposits, Udachnoe and Sredne-Botuobinskoe, where eight explosions were made in 1980ies. These explosions were intended to build a wall of the open pit. Four explosions were made for deep seismic exploring of the Earth. Altogether, from 1964 to 1990, there were 126 non-military explosions in the Ural, near the Caspian Sea, in Ukraine, Evenkia and Yakutia.

That means that people themselves created a powerful source of abyssal gas blows into the atmosphere. Some of these gases are dangerous for the ozone layer. Zones of underground nuclear explosions keeps the activity for several years contaminating with radionuclides a nearby area of 7-10 km and producing aftershocks - micro-earthquakes, which are especially frequent in the first 2 or 3 months (up to 2,000 shocks) and can occur later on too. The researchers have shown a correlation between seismic events and the underground nuclear explosions in Yakutia.
Because of prevailing west winds, the places of explosions affect the ozone shield of the nearby territories to the east of Yakutia - Far North, the Sea of Okhotsk and Canada. The researchers continue monitoring the situation.

Tatiana Pitchugina | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru/eng/2002/2002-08-16-02_187_e.htm

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